Who's A Rat - Largest Online Database of Informants and Agents
HomeMembers LoginLatest NewsRefer A LawyerMessage BoardOnline StoreAffiliatesAbout UsContact Us
Who's A Rat - Largest Online Database of Informants and Agents Worldwide!
Site Navigation
Visit Our Store
Refer A Lawyer
Affiliates
Link To Us
Latest News
Top Secret Documents
Make A Donation
Important Case Law
Members Login
Feedback
Message Board
Legal Information
Advertise your AD, Book or Movie

Informants and Agents?Who's a Rat Message Board

WhosaRat.com
Sign up Calendar
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #1 

http://www.socialsciences.uottawa.ca/crm/eng/profdetails.asp?id=1306



Justin Piché

Justin Piché has conducted studies in three substantive areas: 1) the normalization and proliferation of imprisonment inside and outside the penal system; 2) alternatives to incarceration, punishment and carceral controls; and 3) cultural representations of confinement and penality. He is Co-managing Editor of the Journal of Prisoners on Prisons (www.jpp.org) published by the University of Ottawa Press, which features peer-reviewed articles written by current and former prisoners that link their experiences to broader trends in penal policy and practice discussed in criminological literature. Current research projects include a collaborative study with Kevin Walby (University of Victoria) funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada entitled "A Culture of Penality? Meanings of Incarceration and Punishment in Canada's Penal Tourism Museums". Through an analysis of penal tourism museum narratives, relics, spatial arrangements and curation practices, the study aims to understand how these historical sites contribute to our individual and collective understandings of confinement and punishment, as well as our knowledge concerning the experiences of the imprisoned. A second project, entitled "Locating Penitentiaries in Kingston: How Place Matters", examines how nine federal penitentiaries came to be located in the Kingston area and the sociological implications of these places for prisoners, staff and the region. In working towards a social geography of prisons, the study also examines the architecture and spatial practices that shape interactions within these facilities, explores how staff and prisoners resist these structures that aim to control their lived geographies, and investigates how these institutions are depicted in local culture and contribute to the formation of the region's identity. Professor Piché is in the process of writing articles based on his doctoral dissertation, entitled "The Prison Idea (Un)interrupted: Penal Infrastructure Expansion, Research and Action in Canada", which examined the factors shaping recent prison capacity expansion in Canada. A manuscript for a book is also in preparation that will examine the strengths and limitations of various approaches to public criminology. Justin is interested in collaborating with other researchers and in serving on supervisory committees for graduate students on projects related to his research interests (see below), as well as the following topics: access to information and freedom of information; critical and radical criminologies; collateral consequences of incarceration; prison profiteers; (in)security; and surveillance.

E-Mail Address : justin.piche@uottawa.ca
WWW : http://www.tpcp-canada.blogspot.ca/



0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #2 
http://www.jpp.org/



The Journal of Prisoners on Prisons (JPP) is a prisoner written, academically oriented and peer reviewed, non-profit journal, based on the tradition of the penal press. It brings the knowledge produced by prison writers together with academic arguments to enlighten public discourse about the current state of carceral institutions. This is particularly important because with few exceptions, definitions of deviance and constructions of those participating in these defined acts are incompletely created by social scientists, media representatives, politicians and those in the legal community. These analyses most often promote self-serving interests, omit the voices of those most affected, and facilitate repressive and reactionary penal policies and practices. As a result, the JPP attempts to acknowledge the accounts, experiences, and criticisms of the criminalized by providing an educational forum that allows women and men to participate in the development of research that concerns them directly. In an age where `crime` has become lucrative and exploitable, the JPP exists as an important alternate source of information that competes with popularly held stereotypes and misconceptions about those who are currently, or those who have in the past, faced the deprivation of liberty.
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #3 
FOR THE UNEDUCATED AND UNEDUCABLE

maybe now you will be able to understand my posts
see       https://www.coursera.org/



FREE COLLEGE CLASSES ONLINE


NOTE: YOU NEED TO CUT AND PASTE ENTIRE LINK
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/48358371/ns/technology_and_science-back_to_school/?__utma=14933801.314580738.1342462573.1345243180.1345304666.58&__utmb=14933801.1.10.1345304666&__utmc=14933801&__utmx=-&__utmz=14933801.1342462573.1.1.utmcsr=%28direct%29|utmccn=%28direct%29|utmcmd=%28none%29|utmctr=nbcnews%2Ccom|utmcct=/&__utmv=14933801.|8=Earned%20By=msnbc|cover=1^12=Landing%20Content=Mixed=1^13=Landing%20Hostname=www.nbcnews.com=1^30=Visit%20Type%20to%20Content=Earne  d%20to%20Mixed=1&__utmk=180072996#.UC-4caPh-So

see link for full story
However, two computer science professors from California have set in motion online efforts to teach the world for free and have gained support from five of the nation's top universities.
Stanford professor website
Matt Rivera / NBC News
Professors such as Daphne Koller at Stanford are exploring ways make class time more valuable by putting lectures online.

Andrew Ng and Daphne Koller, creators behind the online learning platform, dubbed Coursera, announced this spring their partnership with Stanford, Princeton, the University of California at Berkeley, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Michigan. The pair's project to be offered next year will offer dozens of online courses to students worldwide and at no cost.

The founders say professors will teach under their university's name and will adapt popular courses for the Web, embedding assignments and exams into video lectures through its website, coursera.org. The online program will allow questions from students on online forums, according to Coursera's statement.

The pair founded Coursera in 2011 after they hosted free online computer science classes at Stanford, gaining 350,000 enrollments from 172 countries, according to the company.
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #4 
Dear Friends, the following position was unanimously adopted on
September 3, 2012, during the board meeting of International CURE
which was held in Washington, DC. Charlie Sullivan, Executive Director

CURE's Expectations for a Justice system

Because we believe that…

• No one deserves to be measured only by the worst thing she or he
has ever done.

• Everyone deserves to be treated with dignity and have his or her
human rights preserved.

• Justice systems should be restorative rather than retributive.

• There is no way to create a perfectly safe world. Expecting that
of our justice systems leads to policies that are counterproductive.

• Detention must be justified by a legitimate public safety concern.

• Those who are incarcerated should have all of the resources they
need to turn their lives around.

• No one should be incarcerated for his or her immigration status.

• National and international human rights documents provide a sound
basis for ensuring that justice systems meet these goals.

• The politics of fear should not be allowed to influence sentencing
practices or parole policies.

• All efforts should be made to depoliticize justice system offices.

• Drug use should be decriminalized and treated as a public health
issue.

• All juvenile cases should be handled in the juvenile system that
is geared toward rehabilitation and education rather than incarceration.

We therefore believe that the following practices should define our
justice systems with respect to…

ADJUDICATION:

Anyone accused of a crime shall be represented by an attorney who has
the qualifications, resources, and time to thoroughly explore the
circumstances surrounding the crime and advocate for the defendant. This is true whether the  crime is considered violent or nonviolent and whether it is resolved by trial or plea agreement.

The justice system shall understand and consider the individual’s
background and accomplishments, as well as the mitigating circumstances of the crime as thoroughly as they understand and consider the aggravating circumstances.

No plea agreement shall occur without negotiations that are done with
an engaged and competent attorney, in a manner that does not result in harm to any
other defendant, and includes the judge.

Anyone who refuses to negotiate a plea agreement and is subsequently
tried and convicted shall not be sentenced to a longer term than was offered in
negotiations.

The defendant shall not appear in court in shackles, restraints, or
jail “uniform.”

Any action that results in the deprivation of an individual’s
liberty shall be decided based only upon the beyond a reasonable doubt standard.

There shall be no loss of voting rights as a result of a criminal
conviction.

The criminal prosecution system shall consider evidence of someone’s
innocence, regardless of when that evidence becomes available and whether or not
the court process or representation was flawed.

SENTENCING:

We shall not incarcerate persons who are mentally ill.

We shall not incarcerate persons who are developmentally disabled.

Juveniles shall never be housed in adult facilities.

There shall be no death penalty.

No one shall be sentenced to life without parole.

There shall be no mandatory sentences, since they prevent adequate
consideration of aggravating and mitigating circumstances.

We shall utilize non-incarcerative sanctions whenever possible. Those
include, but are not limited to:

• Restitution

• Forfeiture of all gains from economic crimes

• Therapeutic solutions

• Restorative/transformative justice and Alternative restorative
justice programs shall be provided to an individual .

• Community service

• Fines and fees based only upon one’s ability to pay.

No one shall be sentenced to a prison term unless it will serve a
greater purpose than

incapacitation.

The minimum sentence for any offense shall be only long enough to
complete an appropriate, well-defined, treatment and training program.

Programming shall be provided in a timely manner.

Time added for aggravating circumstances shall not exceed the sentence
for the basic crime.

We shall not give significant weight to prior criminal history when
crafting a sentence, without considering the probability that recidivism represents a
failure of the justice system.

Felony murder statutes shall be eliminated.

All mandatory minimums shall be abolished.

The cost of the sentence shall be identified at the time of
sentencing.

TREATMENT OF THE INCARCERATED:

The Prison Litigation Reform Act shall be eliminated.

Persons who are incarcerated shall have access to earned benefits
(e.g. retiree health insurance, veterans health care, veteran’s educational benefits,
etc.) in cases where the department of corrections cannot or will not provide comparable services.

No one shall be subject to long-term restraints (greater than 4 hours)
unless authorized and monitored by a medical doctor.

Individuals shall be provided timely and appropriate health care. No
fees shall be charged for health care.

Persons entering the system shall be evaluated to determine their
educational, psychological, and social needs. Every effort shall be made to address
those needs while the individual is incarcerated.

No one shall be held for a lengthy period in a facility (e.g. jail)
that provides very limited programs and services.

No person shall be held in isolation for a nonviolent infraction.

No person shall be held in isolation for a total of more than four
hours for a violent infraction.

There shall be mechanisms to prevent overcrowding, since that
contributes to inhumane treatment.

No one shall be shackled or restrained during labor or if it will
interfere with the delivery of medical care.

Every effort shall be made to compensate for lack of education that
may have contributed to a person’s criminal behavior. GED classes shall be standard and provided free by the state to all prisoners without a diploma or GED. Aptitude testing and vocational training shall be provided to ensure job readiness upon release.

Individuals who are incarcerated shall be able to access Pell grants
and other similar aid programs to facilitate their pursuit of a college education.

Programs, policies, and tools shall ensure that individuals are able
to maintain their social networks through fair and friendly telephone, surface mail, email, and visitation services, including private family visits. Restrictions shall be imposed only if needed to protect specific victim(s). Family members in the free world shall be able to visit any and all incarcerated family members. Subject to security screening, there shall be no limit to the number of persons on a visiting list or call list. At the very least, persons who are indigent shall be provided with postage and writing materials to facilitate contact by
surface mail and at least one call per month to family or friends.

While incarcerated, individuals shall be given responsibilities and
decision-making opportunities. Every opportunity shall be made to utilize the talents
of those who are incarcerated. Those opportunities may be in the form of facility
operation and maintenance, tutoring one another, or providing public services. Where it is possible for an individual to gain certification in an area of expertise that shall be encouraged. Those who are incarcerated shall receive adequate compensation for the work they perform.

Persons shall be paid a minimum wage with a portion going to fines,
fees, child support,victim restitution, and savings for use upon release. To the degree possible, community

service programs shall be available for interested persons.

The United State shall ratify the Optional Protocol to the Convention
Against Torture

(OPCAT), and shall set up a mechanism that will operate to prevent
abuse and torture in the country’s confinement facilities.

No person who is incarcerated shall have administrative, disciplinary,
or supervisory power over others who are incarcerated.

There shall be no involuntary interstate transfers.

Housing shall be by consent.

RELEASE OF THE INCARCERATED:

Regardless of the length of sentence, individuals shall be released if
they become permanently physically incapacitated and are no longer a risk to the
community.

There shall be a presumption of parole at the earliest release date.
Release decisions shall be based upon validated, dynamic risk assessments and performance (including therapy) while incarcerated. The nature of the offense of conviction and criminal history shall not be a factor other than the impact they may have on the outcome of a risk assessment.

Lack of programming staff shall not be used as rationale to delay
release. Based upon validated risk assessment results, persons who have not completed programming through no fault of their own shall be released to the community where they shall receive community treatment and monitoring to ensure their successful re-entry.

Everyone past his or her minimum release date shall have an
opportunity for release annually.

No one shall be denied release because of a pending appeal or for lack
of a home placement. If the individual is not able to live with family members,
adequate housing shall be provided outside of the prison system.

No fee shall be charged by the state for probation or parole services.
This is the responsibility of the state government.

Licensing restrictions shall be imposed only if there is a strong
correlation between the crime(s) committed and the activity being licensed.

Anyone released from a prison shall have access to a re-entry program
for assistance with housing, transportation, job searching, health care, and other needs.

Incarceration shall not be extended through mechanisms such as civil
commitment, lifetime parole, or home confinement. No individual shall be subject
to residency restrictions.

Community supervision, in the form of probation, parole, pre registration shall be imposed only if a dynamic risk assessment indicates it is warranted. Persons
shall be listed on police registries only if they screen high risk on a dynamic risk
instrument. There shall be no public registry.

Social security, veteran’s benefits, pension payments, etc. shall be
available to the person leaving the prison system.

All persons leaving prison shall have their birth certificate, social
security card, and state ID card.
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #5 
For years Andrew Vachss
http://www.vachss.com/updates_page.html

has been telling us, "We make our own monsters." Now, in a paper published in The Wilson Quarterly, Stanford University Professor Tanya Marie Luhrmann ratifies that concept: "Epidemiologists have now homed in on a series of factors that increase the risk of developing schizophrenia, including ... if you were beaten, taunted, bullied, sexually abused, or neglected when you were a child. In fact, how badly a child is treated may predict how severe the case of an adult person with schizophrenia becomes—and particularly, whether the adult hears harsh, hallucinatory voices that comment or command." Click here to read the whole paper.
http://www.wilsonquarterly.com/article.cfm?AID=2196


 Summer 2012
Beyond the Brain
by Tanya Marie Luhrmann

0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #6 

Subject: Concord Prison Psilocybin Rehabilitation Project

http://www.erowid.org/culture/characters/leary_timothy/leary_timothy_concord_prison1.shtml

Leary, T., Metzner, R., Presnell, M., Weil, G., Schwitzgebel, R., & Kinne, S. A change program for adult offenders using psilocybin. _Psychotherapy_, 1965.

Although I don't have this article handy, here's a pretty good (although brief) summary, reproduced without permission, from "Psychedelics Encylopedia", pp. 241-242:

"Three Psilocybin projects were set up in line with Leary and Alpert's specialty, the psychology of 'game-playing.' In early 1961, after initial psilocybin investigations, the Leary group began working in nearby Concord with convicts in the Massachusetts Correctional Institution, a maximum-security prison for young offenders. It was hoped that psilocybin could help prisoners 'see through' the self-defeating 'cops-and-robbers game' and become less destructive citizens ...

The six volunteers grew in number to thirty-five over the next two years. Each underwent two psilocybin experiences during six weeks of bi-weekly meetings. Although the subjects were not very well educated, they were able to detach themselves from their everyday roles and 'confront themselves,' recognizing constructive alternatives to their formerly violent and self-destructive behavior patterns. The question was what would happen to these prisoners upon release. Would the insights gained from two fairly heavy doses of psilocybin help them to lead useful and rewarding lives? Or would they soon be headed back to prison? Dr. Stanley Krippner, who also was given psilocybin at Harvard, ... summed up the results:

Records at Concord State Prison suggested that 64 per cent of the 32 subjects would return to prison within six months after parole. However, after six months, 25 per cent of those on parole had returned, six for technical parole violations and two for new offenses. These results are all the more dramatic when the correctional literature is surveyed; few short-term projects with prisoners have been effective to even a minor degree. In addition, the personality test scores indicated a measurable positive change when pre-psilocybin and post-psilocybin results were compared.

Although this psilocybin experiment included a lot of 'tender, loving care' and ** no control subjects ** [emphasis mine], it established a sound basis for hope. The results warrant at least one controlled study."

Also from _PE_, p. 243: "Second Annual Report; Psilocybin Rehabilitation Project: All the professional work on this project was volunteer. The expenses for clerical assistance and salaries for ex-inmate workers were covered by generous donations from The Uris Brothers Foundation, New York, and the Parapsychology Foundation, Eileen Garrett, President ... Applications to three offices of the U. S. Public Health Service requesting support for continuing this project were refused ... The project was designed as a pilot study -- necessarily exploratory -- since little was known about the long- range application of the substances."
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #7 

see link for full story
http://www.nytimes.com/1990/05/13/style/campus-life-umass-from-street-crime-to-a-life-of-higher-learning.html


Campus Life: UMass; From Street Crime To a Life Of Higher Learning

Published: May 13, 1990
 
 

A 36-year-old ex-convict who turned from street crime and drug addiction to pursue an education at the University of Massachusetts has been honored by the National University Continuing Education Association of Washington.

The man, Roy Eddington, was given the award for outstanding nontraditional degree students on April 30 at a meeting of the group in New Orleans. The award honors a student older than 25 for ''achievement of excellence in pursuit of continuing education,'' said Alleen Deutsch, dean of the division of continuing education at Auburn University and head of the selection committee.

 

Graduating Cum Laude

A felon with a long record of robbery charges and heroin addiction, he entered the Prison Education Project when it began in 1987, while he was serving a six-year sentence for larceny. Last May, he graduated cum laude in general studies, becoming the first inmate in the project to earn an undergraduate degree. He is now pursuing a master's degree in the School of Education.

0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #8 

http://serendip.brynmawr.edu/exchange/courses/360/learning/f12


Learning in Institutional Spaces

 

 From Hack Education

      Jody Cohen, Education 290
      Learning in Institutional Spaces

      Bryn Mawr College, Fall 2012

      TTh 12:45-2:15


     This class is part of a cluster of three courses in a new
     360° called Women in Walled Communities: Silence, Voice,
     Vision
,  which focuses on the constraints and agency of
     individual actors in the institutional settings of women's
     colleges and prison

Protected Reading File

0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #9 
Professor Richards was a convict first....


Dr. Stephen Richards - University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
http://www.uwosh.edu › Home › Faculty & Staff
On December 23, 2009, Richards invited WisconsinEye to hear his speech at Redgranite Correctional Institute where he explained a felon should never let his ...
[DOC]Steve's Vitae - University of Wisconsin Oshkosh
http://www.uwosh.edu/criminaljustice/faculty-staff/vitae/stephen-richards
23. Rose, C. D., Richards, S. C., & (with one UWO student) Nick Sagal (2010). Prison Education: How prisoners and teachers talk about problems and solutions” ...
professor Stephen Richards - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
http://www.jsonline.com › Features
Dec 31, 2006 - Now a tenured professor at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, ... Richards also works in Wisconsin prisons, hoping to convince a new ...
A Convict Perspective on the Classification of Prisoners by Stephen ...
ssrn.com/abstract=2428265
by SC Richards - ‎2003 - ‎Cited by 16 - ‎Related articles
Apr 25, 2014 - Convicts are rarely asked to comment on prison policy or procedure.They have little ... Stephen C. Richards. University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh ...
Beyond Bars: Rejoining Society After Prison: Jeffrey Ian Ross ...
http://www.amazon.com › ... › Social Sciences › Criminology
Richards was sentenced to 9 years and served time in 9 federal prisons. ... he completed his M.A. in sociology (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1989) and ...
Amazon.com: Stephen C. Richards: Books, Biography, Blog ...
http://www.amazon.com/Stephen-C.-Richards/e/B002IP93DK
6 Results - Richards served a 9 year sentence in US federal prison for Conspiracy to ... a BS Degree in Sociology from UW-Madison (1986) while in prison.
Convict Criminology | College
http://www.convictcriminology.org/college.htm
Convict Criminology is now being taught in universities and prisons. ... prisons (Rose et al, 2005; Richards et al, 2006; Richards and Ross, 2007). ... at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, sat down with Production Director Heather Burian of ...
by Stephen C. Richards, Ph.D. - Convict Criminology
http://www.convictcriminology.org/videos.htm
Video One: "Beyond Bars: Rejoining Society After Prison" with Stephen C. Richards, Ph.D. Dr. Stephen C. Richards, professor of criminal justice at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, sat down with Production Director Heather Burian of ...
Undercover students used in drug busts at some University of ...
wisconsinwatch.org/.../undercover-students-used-in-drug-busts-at-some-uw...
6 days ago - Stephen Richards, a UW-Oshkosh criminal justice professor, says ... He refused, was sentenced to nine years in prison and served three.
Justice put him in prison, now justice is his mission (UW-O professor ...
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2714680/posts
Aug 8, 2004 - A recording released by the Republican Party of Wisconsin exposes Professor Stephen Richards using class time to actively campaign for the ...
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #10 
In 1971 Bob Belenky was Dean of Goddard College
Graduate School.
Bob approached some ex- cons in 1972 and offered them a full
scholarship to attend Goddard Graduate School and work on
their Masters Degree in Criminology. Their need for a undergraduate degree
would be waived because of the time they spent in prison
and what they had done with their lives since leaving prison.
Some of the men graduated and got their M.A. in Criminology.

Men who attended this program included

John Anthony
Arnold Coles
Martin Feeney
Harry Orcutt
Ken Abramson



John Anthony was
founder of Self Development Group
Price of Punishment Chapter 5 - Prison Policy Initiative
http://www.prisonpolicy.org/scans/price/chapter5.shtml
Every one of the existing Massachusetts prisons was built in the name of reform. ..... women in prisons. Self-Development Group, Inc. 3 Joy St., Boston, Mass.


Reform Organizations Release Report on Prison Crisis Here | News ...
http://www.thecrimson.com/.../11/.../reform-organizations-release-report-on-priso...
Nov 11, 1971 - asked the statement of the Massachusetts council on Crime and ... Edward A. Aronson, executive director of Self Development Group, Inc., said ...



Ken Abramson. see
A Guide to Correctional Vocational Training: The First National ...
files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED097499.pdf
by V Ertle - ‎1973
to minicourses; from programs in maximum security prisons to programs that send ...... Kenneth Abramson, ProjectDirector, The Medfield-Norfolk Prison. Project ...



The Daily Messenger from Canandaigua, New York · Page 9
http://www.newspapers.com/newspage/22019886/
Jul 27, 1972 - (UPI) Prisoner Rehabilitation Program Works By RICHARD C, ... Unguarded by either walls or guns, Bill is one of 10 Norfolk inmates training -- with ... Ken Abramson, who runs the Medfield program, spent 18 years behind ...


Robert Belenky went on to do some
other projects
see

http://www.robertbelenky.com/The_Book_of_Bob/Website_Contents.html
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #11 
Now in his early 70's ,Walter Silva
lives on Cape Cod in Massachusetts
He developed a program that helped
men serving life sentences get their
Bachelors Degree while serving their
sentence in prison.


Walter Silva | LinkedIn
http://www.linkedin.com/pub/walter-silva/25/1a4/b00
United States - ‎--
View Walter Silva's professional profile on LinkedIn. ... Metropolitan College; Director - Prison Education Program at Boston University, Metropolitan College.
Campus Life: UMass; From Street Crime To a Life Of Higher Learning
http://www.nytimes.com/.../campus-life-umass-from-street-crime-to-a-life-of-hig...
May 13, 1990 - The project has 34 prisoners, Mr. Silva said. Other projects coordinated by the Massachusetts Council on Prison Education enroll 800 prisoners ...
Learning in Institutional Spaces | Serendip Studio
serendip.brynmawr.edu › Home › Groups › Walled Women
May 4, 2012 - From Hack Education Jody Cohen, Education 290 Learning in ... Walter Silva, “A Brief History of Prison Education in the United States” in ...
Higher education in prison : a contradiction in terms ... - View Map
library.muohio.edu/multifacet/record/mu3ugb2006308
The Paradox of Higher Education in Prisons / Raymond L. Jones, Peter d'Errico 1 . A Brief History of Prison Higher Education in the United States / Walter Silva ...
Prison Education - Academia.edu
http://www.academia.edu/.../Education_Under_the_Gun_The_Teaching_of_Writ...
1 That the term “correctional education” so closely resembles some of the central ..... Walter Silva's “A Brief History of Prison Higher Education in the United ...
Higher education in prison : a contradiction in terms? / edited by ...
elibrary.wayne.edu/record=1302756
Contents, The paradox of higher education in prisons / Raymond L. Jones and ... A brief history of prison higher education in the United States / Walter Silva ...
In Time: Women's Poetry from Prision - Boston Phoenix
bostonphoenix.com/alt1/archive/books/.../03.../WOMEN_S_POETRY.html
It's hard to imagine a better argument in favor of prison education. ... Professor Elizabeth "Ma" Barker, and currently directed by Walter Silva), Warren set out to ...
Towers Library Catalog /NWMSU
towers.searchmobius.org:2082/search~S4/a?Licence%2C+June
Title, Higher education in prison : a contradiction in terms? / edited by Miriam ... Brief History of Prison Higher Education in the United States / Walter Silva, 17.
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #12 
vsee link for full story

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/09/books/professors-with-a-past.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/09/books/professors-with-a-past.html

Professors With a Past














August 9, 2003


When Stephen C. Richards, a criminology professor, steps up to the rostrum on the first day of his sociology of corrections classes at Northern Kentucky University, he usually begins his lecture with a confession and a promise.
''I'm an ex-con,'' Mr. Richards, who served nine years in federal prison for selling marijuana, tells his students. ''I'm going to tell some stories and use some profane language. You'll read books that you might not read in other classes. And by the end of the semester, you're going to know more about prisons than you ever imagined.''
Mr. Richards is a self-described ''convict criminologist,'' one of a small, tightly knit group of ex-convict professors who are shaking up the criminal justice field by challenging some of the academic establishment's assumptions about prisons and inmates. With convictions ranging from selling heroin to armed robbery and even murder, they have tenure-track positions at public universities, attend academic conferences and act as mentors to current convicts who hope some day to join their ranks.
While there have long been isolated ex-convicts keeping a low profile in academia -- last month a Pennsylvania State University education professor named Paul Krueger resigned when the university discovered he had spent 12 years in prison after pleading guilty in 1965 to a triple murder -- these criminologists are the first group of ex-convict professors to organize into a scholarly movement.

''What's different about the convict criminologists is that they publicly proclaim their ex-offender status,'' said Francis T. Cullen, a criminal justice professor at the University of Cincinnati. ''And they're consciously coming together and arguing that if you systematize their experience, you can come up with a new criminology.''
The movement has sparked controversy, not so much because of its members' backgrounds as because of their ideas, which were set forth in a manifesto of sorts published this year, ''Convict Criminology,'' which Mr. Richards edited along with Jeffrey Ian Ross, a professor of criminology at the University of Baltimore (Thomson Wadsworth). The book's thesis is that having spent time in jail, convict criminologists have a better understanding of the criminal justice system than professors who have studied prison from the comfort of their offices. The former inmates engage in research to support their argument that incarceration is overused in the United States -- which has a prison population of 2.2 million -- and that prison is needlessly dehumanizing.
''Ex-cons make good criminology professors because we know so much about the system,'' Mr. Richards said. ''There are academics who feel somewhat threatened because we're challenging their expertise. Very few venture into prisons, and they never really get it.''
The debate about firsthand experience echoes others that have roiled the academy about who is best suited to teach women's studies, Jewish studies and black studies, as well as less contentious discussions about whether published novelists make the best writing teachers, former corporate executives make the best business professors and so on.
There are around a dozen ex-convict criminology professors around the country; another dozen in the late stages of their graduate school work, soon to become junior faculty members; and still others studying for degrees in prison. Most say they are motivated toward academia by a combination of idealism and practicality: deeply affected by the experience of prison, they share an urge to improve conditions for fellow inmates. And because getting jobs in the private sector is difficult for those with felonies on their records, academia offers at least the chance of a career.
''A lot of convicts want to make use of their time and come out better prepared,'' said John Irwin, a professor of criminology at San Francisco State University who spent five years in prison for armed robbery. ''This couples with the fact that you can never get away from your prison experience.''
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #13 


PDF]SCAR'd Times: Maine's Prisoners' Rights Movement, 1971-1976
scholarworks.umass.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1631&context...
by DS Chard - ‎2011 - ‎Cited by 2 - ‎Related articles
interviews: Ray Luc Levasseur, Robbie Bothen, Pat Levasseur, Barbara Chassie, Dianne ... my questions about Maine's prisoners' rights movement through


http://scholarworks.umass.edu/2011.3.html
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #14 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeb
vsee link for full story

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/09/books/professors-with-a-past.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/08/09/books/professors-with-a-past.html

Professors With a Past


if link is changed by FBI agents
google title











August 9, 2003


When Stephen C. Richards, a criminology professor, steps up to the rostrum on the first day of his sociology of corrections classes at Northern Kentucky University, he usually begins his lecture with a confession and a promise.
''I'm an ex-con,'' Mr. Richards, who served nine years in federal prison for selling marijuana, tells his students. ''I'm going to tell some stories and use some profane language. You'll read books that you might not read in other classes. And by the end of the semester, you're going to know more about prisons than you ever imagined.''
Mr. Richards is a self-described ''convict criminologist,'' one of a small, tightly knit group of ex-convict professors who are shaking up the criminal justice field by challenging some of the academic establishment's assumptions about prisons and inmates. With convictions ranging from selling heroin to armed robbery and even murder, they have tenure-track positions at public universities, attend academic conferences and act as mentors to current convicts who hope some day to join their ranks.
While there have long been isolated ex-convicts keeping a low profile in academia -- last month a Pennsylvania State University education professor named Paul Krueger resigned when the university discovered he had spent 12 years in prison after pleading guilty in 1965 to a triple murder -- these criminologists are the first group of ex-convict professors to organize into a scholarly movement.

''What's different about the convict criminologists is that they publicly proclaim their ex-offender status,'' said Francis T. Cullen, a criminal justice professor at the University of Cincinnati. ''And they're consciously coming together and arguing that if you systematize their experience, you can come up with a new criminology.''
The movement has sparked controversy, not so much because of its members' backgrounds as because of their ideas, which were set forth in a manifesto of sorts published this year, ''Convict Criminology,'' which Mr. Richards edited along with Jeffrey Ian Ross, a professor of criminology at the University of Baltimore (Thomson Wadsworth). The book's thesis is that having spent time in jail, convict criminologists have a better understanding of the criminal justice system than professors who have studied prison from the comfort of their offices. The former inmates engage in research to support their argument that incarceration is overused in the United States -- which has a prison population of 2.2 million -- and that prison is needlessly dehumanizing.
''Ex-cons make good criminology professors because we know so much about the system,'' Mr. Richards said. ''There are academics who feel somewhat threatened because we're challenging their expertise. Very few venture into prisons, and they never really get it.''
The debate about firsthand experience echoes others that have roiled the academy about who is best suited to teach women's studies, Jewish studies and black studies, as well as less contentious discussions about whether published novelists make the best writing teachers, former corporate executives make the best business professors and so on.
There are around a dozen ex-convict criminology professors around the country; another dozen in the late stages of their graduate school work, soon to become junior faculty members; and still others studying for degrees in prison. Most say they are motivated toward academia by a combination of idealism and practicality: deeply affected by the experience of prison, they share an urge to improve conditions for fellow inmates. And because getting jobs in the private sector is difficult for those with felonies on their records, academia offers at least the chance of a career.
''A lot of convicts want to make use of their time and come out better prepared,'' said John Irwin, a professor of criminology at San Francisco State University who spent five years in prison for armed robbery. ''This couples with the fact that you can never get away from your prison experience.''
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #15 


http://www.prisontalk.com/forums/showthread.php?t=513633


About to be a college graduate/convicted violent felon
I'm about to get my BA in psychology, and a month later, be convicted of felonious assault with a knife, which is not expungeable in OH anymore. I know that 95% of jobs are now off limits for me, but what about the jobs available in academia, etc if one has a Ph.d?

Since becoming a FELON(or about to; and it appears I'm gonna be as the victim appears to want a full crucifixion), I've been researching my prospects in life and it all appears pretty grim with the current felon disenfranchisement/expungement laws in this country. Could I maybe get my ph.d in criminology and be able to become an outspoken advocate of reform? Would I be able to teach in criminology and/or psychology(been thinking about both, as my undergrad is in psych) with a ph.d? I've read that people with ph.ds can't be licensed, but can teach at the graduate level. Is this true?
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by joeb


PDF]SCAR'd Times: Maine's Prisoners' Rights Movement, 1971-1976
scholarworks.umass.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1631&context...
by DS Chard - ‎2011 - ‎Cited by 2 - ‎Related articles
interviews: Ray Luc Levasseur, Robbie Bothen, Pat Levasseur, Barbara Chassie, Dianne ... my questions about Maine's prisoners' rights movement through


http://scholarworks.umass.edu/2011.3.html


http://scholarworks.umass.edu/2011.3.html
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #17 
Sunday, August 9, 2015
Prisoners' Justice Day march tomorrow at 4pm on Algonquin Territory / in Ottawa


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


http://tpcp-canada.blogspot.com/

Calls renewed for an end to solitary confinement and other prison policies
and practices that contribute to deaths in custody

August 9, 2015 (Algonquin Territory / Ottawa) – Prisoners’ Justice Day (PJD) emerged as a prisoner-initiated day of non-violent strike action to commemorate the death of Eddie Nalon in the segregation unit of Millhaven maximum-security penitentiary on August 10th 1974. It was first observed in 1975, and in 1976 the prisoners of Millhaven issued a communication calling for one-day hunger strikes in opposition to the use of solitary confinement and in support of prisoners’ rights, in memory of Eddie Nalon and Robert Landers, who also died alone in solitary confinement. Since then, PJD has become an internationally-recognized day of solidarity and action, both inside and outside prison walls, to commemorate deaths in custody and to demand justice for the human rights atrocities that states and their officials authorize and engage in.

Tomorrow, we will observe PJD for the 40th time because preventable deaths in custody, like that of Ashley Smith who died in a segregation cell at Grand Valley Institution in 2007, still occur. Despite occasional public outcries and government promises for much needed reforms to save lives, little has changed. While many Canadians were in tears at the images of Ashley’s treatment in prison, at least 321 prisoners died in federal penitentiaries from 2008 to 2014, according to Correctional Service of Canada and Public Safety Canada figures compiled by the Criminalization and Punishment Education Project. Between 2008-09 and 2010-11, 80 deaths were reported in provincial jails and prisons, where people continue to die. The recent deaths of Edward Snowshoe and Kinew James behind bars are a solemn and tragic reminder that Canada’s prisons disproportionately target, warehouse and harm indigenous people, part of the colonial legacy highlighted by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. As they did four decades ago, prisons still kill and maim, still traumatize captives and captors alike during their time behind bars, and still greatly diminish the common humanity we all share.

It is not enough to shed tears and ask for change – we must demand it. A PJD march is taking place tomorrow at 4:00pm on Algonquin Territory / in Ottawa. It begins at the Jack Purcell Community Centre (320 Jack Purcell Lane). Following a land acknowledgement and brief introduction to PJD, demonstrators will proceed to the constituency office of Ontario Minister of Corrections and Community Safety Yasir Naqvi (109 Catherine Street). There, former prisoners from the Ottawa-Carleton Detention Centre (OCDC) and groups like the End Immigration Detention Network, which have been advocating for detainees held indefinitely in a maximum-security wing of the Lindsay jail, will talk about conditions and make demands concerning provincial prisons operated by the Government of Ontario. Marchers will then walk to Correctional Service of Canada national headquarters (340 Laurier Avenue West). Ex-prisoners and family members with loved ones behind bars will discuss living and dying in federal penitentiaries, and demand real change to uphold human rights and prevent deaths in facilities run by the Government of Canada going forward. The action concludes at the Human Rights Monument (at the corner of Elgin Street and Lisgar Street) where 40 seconds of silence will be observed to mark the past 40 years of inaction during which hundreds lost their lives while under the ‘care’ of Canada’s ‘correctional’ authorities.

Concerned members of the community are encouraged to participate in this non-violent action. Journalists are also welcome to attend.



OUR DEMANDS FOR #pjd2015

End the mass incarceration of indigenous peoples and minorities

End the use of solitary confinement

End prison crowding

End pre-trial, immigration and foreign worker detention

End the criminalization of political dissidents, sex workers, and those with mental health and substance (mis)-use issues



To arrange for media interviews with former prisoners,
relatives of current prisoners and their supporters contact:
Justin Piché, Criminalization and Punishment Education Project,
613-793-1093 or justin.piche@uottawa.ca
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #18 

http://www.restorativejustice.org/articlesdb/articles/8675

Summary
Piche, Justin (2006). Restorative Prisons? M.A. Thesis. Department of Criminology. Univeristy of Ottawa.
In my study, I have identified 277 initiatives that claim to be in the business of restorative justice, many of which are either funded, administrated or receive their case loads from institutions within the existing 'criminal justice' system. In these cases, we must ask ourselves whether the restorative justice initiatives operating within the parameters of the 'criminal justice' system adhere to the objectives, values and principles outlined in the philosophy of restorative justice. To begin to address this very question, which is the central objective of this study, I examine one particular pilot project administered by Correction Service Canada (CSC) from April 2001 to November 2005 called the Restorative Justice Unit (RJ Unit). This program, which was housed in Grande Cache Institution (GCI), was created by CSC to determine whether or not it would be feasible to transform the prison into a restorative correctional environment. In my analysis of this program, I unpack this notion and demonstrate that CSC has merely adopted the descriptors of the restorative approach to legitimate punishment and control under the guise of restorative justice and the rehabilitative rhetoric of the cognitive behavioural approach. (author's abstract)
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #19 
Massachusetts ex-con Arnie Coles , a African American
received his Maters Degree in Criminology
from Goddard College and was involved with Union College
where he got his PhD.


Ex-Convicts Ask for Student Support
Propose Harvard Halfway House
By Travis P. Dungan, October 5, 1973


http://www.thecrimson.com/article/1973/10/5/ex-convicts-ask-for-student-support-ptwo/

Two ex-convicts pleaded with 40 students in Phillips Brooks House last night to help re-channel some of the economic and educational resources of Harvard to overcrowded and unfit prisons in Massachusetts.

John McGrath, a member of the National Coalition for Correctional Change, proposed that students work to have Harvard build several halfway houses on University-owned property in Boston and Cambridge.

"There is so much you undergraduates could do." Arnie Coles, president of the National Prisoners' Rights Association said at the meeting. "Students are the only ones who have consistently supported prisoners and shared their education and resources and you can't stop now. We need your resources."

"You're in your own prisons here at Harvard," Coles said. "It's about time you come to Walpole and find out what principles are all about. You could see that our society's prisons are nothing but the dumping grounds for people who are denied schooling and training."

McGrath complained that no professors had come to the organizational meeting of the PBH Prisoners Committee. "The government gives away all its money to Boston University. Harvard University so that all the intellectuals do research here but they never apply anything to society. They talk about peace. Well, if they don't do anything at home first, we'll just have to wake them up. Maybe we'll have to burn some girl here in Harvard Square," he said.

Joseph Sandler '75, co-chairman of the Prisoners Committee, told the group. "You can try to lock up all your problems. But they're starting to come out now and there's nothing you can do to stop them."

Sandler said the two most significant problems in prison reform were the lack of access of lawyers and the public to prisoners and the failure to hold prison guards and officials accountable for their treatment of inmates.

When Governor Francis W. Sargent fired reform-minded corrections commissioner John Boone this August, Sandler said, he exacerbated these problems by cutting out such innovative programs as prisoner furloughs and 24-hour citizen observation in prisons.

"The guards at Walpole played games with the prisoners to incite riots in order to keep the pot boiling. It was a deliberate and successful attempt to get rid of Boone and his programs, to justify human warehousing and more security." Sandler said.

In response to a question from the audience Coles said. "No penal system will work. Life sentences won't deter some people from doing anything."

Sandler suggested that students act on McGrath's proposal and ask Charles U. Daly, vice president for Government and Community Affairs, to have Harvard fund a halfway house in Cambridge. He also proposed that students lobby in the state legislature for a more reasonable penal code
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #20 

http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/state-inmates-solitary-confinement-surpass-4-000-article-1.2456485

State inmates in solitary confinement surpass 4,000 despite vows to limit use

Sunday, December 6, 2015, 4:00 AM


       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
1
       
       
       
       
       
       
       

In response to a federal lawsuit, state correction officials announced in February that they would reduce the use of solitary confinement for pregnant inmates and prisoners under 18.

The number of state prison inmates tossed in solitary confinement has surpassed 4,000 for the first time in three years, despite vows by officials to limit its use, the Daily News has learned.

And prison advocates say there’s been an increase since this summer, due in large part to backlash from correction officers after the June escape of Richard Matt and David Sweat from the Clinton Correctional Facility upstate.

In response to a federal lawsuit, state correction officials announced in February that they would reduce the use of solitary confinement for pregnant inmates and prisoners under 18. The reforms also included limiting the punishment to 30 days for convicts with developmental disabilities.

Initially, there was a sharp drop.

The number of inmates in solitary confinement fell to 6.8% of the total inmate population on June 1, state records show. The 3,621 prisoners in solitary that month marked the lowest total in at least the last three years.

But it suddenly spiked by almost 300 inmates in July, bringing the percentage to about 7.4% of the state’s total prison population. By September, the number of inmates in solitary surpassed 4,000 for the first time since 2012, records show. On Tuesday, there were 4,029 inmates in solitary, documents show.

“What’s so disturbing is that it has taken years to get some small change … and that got swept away in three months,” said Jack Beck of the Correctional Association, one of the nation’s oldest
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #21 
Tracking the Politics of Criminalization and Punishment in Canada



tpcp-canada.blogspot.com/


Dec 6, 2015 - Commentary that aims to make sense of recent developments in the politics of criminalization and punishment in the Canadian context. Follow ...





Justin Piché - SSHRC 2012 Aurora Prize - YouTube
Video for justin piche
▶ 3:53

Nov 1, 2012 - Uploaded by SSHRC-CRSH
Justin Piché - SSHRC 2012 Aurora Prize ------------------------------------------------
0
joeb

Registered:
Posts: 8,739
Reply with quote  #22 



3 stories



College for Convicts: The Case for Higher Education in American ...
https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0786495332
Christopher Zoukis - 2014 - ‎Education
The Case for Higher Education in American Prisons Christopher Zoukis. “Prison ... Richards, S., D. Faggiani, K. Roffers, R. Hendricksen, and J. Krueger. ... Piché, J. “Barriers to Knowing Inside: Education in Prisons and Education on Prisons.
Facilitating Prisoner Ethnography - Qualitative Inquiry
qix.sagepub.com/content/20/4/449.refs


Justin Piché, Assistant Professor, Department of Criminology, University of Ottawa, 120 University, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5, Canada. ... Based on our editorial work with the Journal of Prisoners on Prisons—a ..... Richards S.,; Ross J. I.. (2004) ...
The Marion Experiment: Long-Term Solitary Confinement and the ...
https://books.google.com/books?isbn=0809333775
Stephen C. Richards - 2015 - ‎Social Science


Long-Term Solitary Confinement and the Supermax Movement Stephen C. Richards. Department of Correctional Services. Retrieved December 6, 2011, from ...
USP Marion: A Few Prisoners Summon the Courage to Speak ...
https://www.semanticscholar.org/...Prisoners...Richards/db6a0f73250cf5af8...
USP Marion: A Few Prisoners Summon the Courage to Speak. Stephen C. Richards; 2015 ... Justin Piché, Kevin Walby · British Journal of Criminology; 2010 ...
0
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.

? ?
Copyright ? 2001-2004 Who?s A Rat. All Rights Reserved.
Reproduction in whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission is prohibited.
?