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hannah

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Reply with quote  #1 

Also learn LEA screening methods, techniques, questions asked during the tests and how to counter trick questions....

(several narratives are written for each agency by actual applicants who tried to get hired...)




Learn How to Pass (or Beat) a Polygraph Test | AntiPolygraph.org

 
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Non-profit, public interest website dedicated to exposing and ending polygraph waste, fraud, and abuse.

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Discuss polygraph (lie detector) issues here. All points of view ...

Personal Statements

 
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Victims of the polygraph speak about their experiences.

The Lie Behind the Lie Detector

 
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"As the lie behind the lie detector becomes more and more widely ...

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A blog for news about polygraphs, voice stress analyzers, and ...

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Open pdf and word files online instead of on your puter'
http://view.samurajdata.se/

USE the net more securely:
https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/blog/2014/04/help-support-little-known-privacy-tool-has-been-critical-journalists-reporting-nsa
https://www.torproject.org/download/download

http://www.theintelligencenews.com/


"The world isn't run by weapons anymore, or energy, or money. It's run by little ones and zeroes......"



"There's a war out there, old friend. A world war. And it's not about who's got the most bullets. It's about who controls the information.... it's all about the information!"
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hannah

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Reply with quote  #2 
0948.pdf   RATS: Guide to Protection Against Informants November 30, 2012

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Use TAILS
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How to boot from USB and other great stuff:
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Open pdf and word files online instead of on your puter'
http://view.samurajdata.se/

USE the net more securely:
https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/blog/2014/04/help-support-little-known-privacy-tool-has-been-critical-journalists-reporting-nsa
https://www.torproject.org/download/download

http://www.theintelligencenews.com/


"The world isn't run by weapons anymore, or energy, or money. It's run by little ones and zeroes......"



"There's a war out there, old friend. A world war. And it's not about who's got the most bullets. It's about who controls the information.... it's all about the information!"
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hannah

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Federal agencies increasingly using polygraphs on employees

http://www.star-telegram.com/2012/12/05/4464111/federal-agencies-increasingly.html
Posted Wednesday, Dec. 05, 2012 0 comments
US NEWS POLYGRAPH 5 ABA

View photos



By Marisa Taylor

McClatchy Newspapers

WASHINGTON -- She was one of the brightest students at a leading university when the Central Intelligence Agency offered her a job as a counterterrorism analyst. But first, the 19-year-old was warned, she had to undergo a polygraph test to determine whether she could be trusted.

Instead of scrutinizing her ability to guard government secrets, polygraphers asked about her reported rape and miscarriage, the woman recalled.

Over at least eight hours in three sessions, polygraphers repeatedly demanded to know her innermost thoughts, even after she started sobbing in shame.

"At one point, one of the polygraphers said to me, 'Turn on the light inside so I can see,'" said the woman, who asked that her name be withheld. "I was amazed at how creepy and invasive the whole process was."

Last year, more than 73,000 Americans submitted to polygraphs to get or keep jobs with the federal government, although such screening is mostly banned in the private sector and widely denounced by scientists.

Most of the screenings probably aren't as harsh as the CIA applicant described.

But polygraphers at a growing number of U.S. agencies are asking employees and applicants about their personal lives and private thoughts in the name of protecting the country from spies, terrorists or corrupt law officers.

The government describes polygraphs as an imperfect but effective way of preventing its secrets from being leaked at a time when almost 5 million people have been approved to access classified information.

Many people who undergo a polygraph describe it as one of the most emotional, terrifying and shameful experiences of their lives.

Polygraphers routinely coax people into revealing secrets or experiences they haven't told their friends, relatives or therapists.

The polygraphers record the sessions and keep details of the results, sharing them across the government when someone applies to other agencies.

Scientists, however, aren't sure that polygraph machines can tell whether someone is lying or even withholding information.

Some independent studies have concluded that the testing is no more accurate than a coin toss.

Despite such doubts, Congress and the courts no longer aggressively scrutinize the federal polygraph programs.

People who undergo the tests often can't get access to information about their interrogations, and most are barred from filing complaints in federal court.

In 2003, the National Academies urged federal agencies to stop using the tests as a screening technique.

The organization, which advises the government on scientific matters, examined thousands of polygraph studies and concluded that the risk of innocent people failing the test, and spies passing it, was too high.

Since then, 15 agencies -- from the National Security Agency to the FBI to the Postal Inspection Service -- have either continued or expanded polygraph screenings, McClatchy Newspapers found.

Many agencies now target a growing number of private contractors as well. Only the Energy Department dramatically scaled back the screening after its own scientists protested.

"The federal government obviously has ignored the scientific consensus," Stephen Fienberg, the chairman of the National Academies' polygraph panel, told McClatchy.

"What we showed, without equivocation, is that the polygraph machine is too blunt an instrument to be relied on for screening."

The government itself hasn't reached a consensus on the best approach to screening -- or the ethical limits of it -- more than 70 years after adopting the practice.

McClatchy interviewed dozens of polygraphers, national security experts and people who've been screened and found vast differences in how the tests are conducted.

Six agencies, including the Energy Department, try to stick to national security questions, such as whether someone has leaked classified information or has inappropriate relationships with foreigners, McClatchy found.

These polygraphers are supposed to avoid delving into other personal matters, such as sexual conduct and psychological issues.

Bruce Held, the director of intelligence and counterintelligence for the Energy Department, said he wanted to avoid relying on Draconian security measures that might unintentionally encourage spying by alienating his employees.

"What we're looking for is whether you are a spy, terrorist or saboteur, not whether you have some peccadillo in your life," said Held, a retired CIA officer.

The nine other agencies that still use polygraph screening, however, see it as crucial in rooting out applicants or employees who are hiding crimes or deviant or unstable behavior that should bar them from certain jobs.

These agencies delve into personal conduct such as past drug use, sexual perversions, undisclosed crimes and financial problems.

The Naval Criminal Investigative Service once asked only national security questions but recently decided to start asking its special agent applicants more personal questions.

David Bogue, the head of the service's polygraph program, said screening helps the agency find "potential insider threats" and hire people who are "trustworthy and suitable."

Details about how the government conducts polygraph screening are rarely discussed publicly, because many polygraphers cite the need to protect national security and many people who've been screened fear being identified.

Many federal agencies, including the CIA and FBI, declined to grant McClatchy interviews or respond to basic questions, such as how many people undergo polygraphs.

To prevent abuses in such a secretive culture, inspectors from the government-run National Center for Credibility Assessment routinely scrutinize polygraph programs.

William Norris, the center's director, said inspectors interview top officials and review a sampling of results to ensure that "ethical, professional and technical standards" are being met.

Federal polygraphers also receive more than three months of training at the center.

A McClatchy reporter, however, spoke to veteran polygraphers from a wide array of agencies who described how they often rely on their own instincts and experiences to determine the relevance of a topic.

Some polygraphers, for instance, think that asking someone about being raped could be legitimate in certain circumstances. Others disagree.

"Where is the line? That depends on the polygrapher and the agency," said John Sullivan, a retired CIA polygrapher of more than three decades.

"It can be a slippery slope. At a certain point, the government can justify almost anything."

One Defense Intelligence Agency employee accused a polygrapher last year of jumping to the wrong conclusions during her screening because she's a U.S. citizen of Pakistani origin, according to a copy of her complaint.

The polygrapher accused her of trying to deceive him when she countered that she was telling him the truth.

The woman, an intelligence officer, previously worked with polygraphers who told her that even truthful people can be seen as having deceptive responses because they second-guess themselves.

As a result, she said in the complaint, she concentrated on providing honest responses.

However, the polygrapher said he thought she was using what are known as "countermeasures" to prevent him from reading her results.

The woman no longer works for the Defense Intelligence Agency, but she asked not to be named because she still works for the government.

When she appealed and asked the agency to view the tape, it restored her national security clearance.

"Polygraphers aren't trained scientists," said Fienberg, a nationally respected statistician.

"They haven't a clue what impact an interrogation has on people's likely responses."

+++++++++++
Coming Friday

As polygraph screening flourishes, critics say oversight is abandoned.

Agencies that

use polygraphs

in screenings

These federal agencies use polygraph screening for at least some of their applicants or employees:

Air Force Office of Special Investigations

Army Intelligence and Security Command

Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives

CIA

Customs and Border Protection

Defense Intelligence Agency

Energy Department

Drug Enforcement Administration

FBI

National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency

National Reconnaissance Office

National Security Agency

Naval Criminal Investigative Service

Postal Inspection Service

Secret Service

Have more to add? News tip? Tell us




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US NEWS POLYGRAPH 5 ABA

MCT archives

Polygrapher John Sullivan

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http://view.samurajdata.se/

USE the net more securely:
https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/blog/2014/04/help-support-little-known-privacy-tool-has-been-critical-journalists-reporting-nsa
https://www.torproject.org/download/download

http://www.theintelligencenews.com/


"The world isn't run by weapons anymore, or energy, or money. It's run by little ones and zeroes......"



"There's a war out there, old friend. A world war. And it's not about who's got the most bullets. It's about who controls the information.... it's all about the information!"
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hannah

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Posts: 797
Reply with quote  #4 
7 April 2013

Polygraph Countermeasures

Antipolygraph.org has published a set of documents on polygraph countermeasures. Deceptive persons can use countermeasures to fool the polygraph, and owing to the high error rate associated with polygraph screening, truthful persons may also wish to use them to mitigate the risk of a false positive outcome.

Publicly, polygraphers claim that countermeasures don't work and that they can easily detect them. But these documents, prepared by polygraphers for the training of other polygraphers and not intended for public dissemination, tell a different story.

These documents also show that the polygraph community is deeply concerned about the information provided by AntiPolygraph.org in our free book,
https://antipolygraph.org/lie-behind-the-lie-detector.pdf
The Lie Behind the Lie Detector and by Doug Williams in his manual, "How to Sting the Polygraph," which is offered for sale at Polygraph.com. Interestingly, the polygraph community does not seem to be remotely interested in Al Qaeda's views on the polygraph, which AntiPolygraph.org found and translated to English in 2002.
https://antipolygraph.org/documents/al-qaeda-lie-detection.shtml
None of the polygraph documents, even one presented at an international counterterrorism conference in 2005, mention that.

The documents, with brief descriptions of each, are available here:

https://antipolygraph.org/read.shtml#countermeasure-files

Cryptome readers may wish to consider mirroring them.

--

George W. Maschke, Ph.D.
AntiPolygraph.org
Tel: 1-424-835-1225
Fax: 1-206-426-5145
Skype: georgemaschke
Twitter: http://twitter.com/ap_org

__________________
Test your connection for leaks:
http://ip-check.info/?lang=en

Use TAILS
https://tails.boum.org/

How to boot from USB and other great stuff:
http://www.rmprepusb.com/

Open pdf and word files online instead of on your puter'
http://view.samurajdata.se/

USE the net more securely:
https://pressfreedomfoundation.org/blog/2014/04/help-support-little-known-privacy-tool-has-been-critical-journalists-reporting-nsa
https://www.torproject.org/download/download

http://www.theintelligencenews.com/


"The world isn't run by weapons anymore, or energy, or money. It's run by little ones and zeroes......"



"There's a war out there, old friend. A world war. And it's not about who's got the most bullets. It's about who controls the information.... it's all about the information!"
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