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joeb Show full post »
joeb








The police recording you need to hear after a black woman 'broke into' her own home



http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-audio-fay-wells-locked-out-while-black-20151119-htmlstory.html
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joeb
Technology
Bakersfield detective took bribes from drug dealer
November 22 2015

http://tvnewsroom.org/newslines/technology/bakersfield-detective-took-bribes-from-drug-dealer-26025/

In one 2012 incident, the indictment alleges, Diaz was supposed to book into evidence one pound of methamphetamine recovered in a traffic stop but instead kept a portion of it “for his own personal gain”.

A 16-count indictment against Detective Damacio Diaz was returned Thursday by a grand jury, U.S. Attorney Benjamin B. Wagner said Friday at a Bakersfield news conference. Part of Diaz’s duties included using criminal informants to buy drugs from suspected dealers, which enabled officers to seek search warrants. Diaz has worked at the Bakersfield Police Department
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joeb


http://motherboard.vice.com/read/hacker-outs-himself-as-fbi-snitch-and-claims-he-helped-track-down-isis

Hacker Outs Himself as FBI ‘Snitch’ and Claims He Helped Track Down ISIS




November 23, 2015 // 03:47 PM EST



A hacker who in the past gained notoriety for hacking the Anonymous pseudo-official Twitter accounts, now claims he served as an FBI informant and helped the US government track down the hacker turned ISIS fighter Junaid Hussain.

“5hm00p,” a well-known troll, hacker, and member of the trolling and hacking collective Rustle League, identified himself over the weekend as an FBI “snitch,” as he put it.

“What the fuck have I done,” he tweeted cryptically early Sunday morning. Then, more than 15 hours later, he began tweeting at the FBI Twitter account, with some tweets clearly written in anguish.

“I lost a lot of good friendships and my fucking honor,” 5hm00p tweeted at the FBI, according to an archived copy of his now deleted tweets. “I'm so embarrassed to show my face in public now because of this.”

He said that he helped kill a hacker named Junaid “TriCk” Hussain, who left the UK and joined ISIS in 2013. 5hm00p claimed to be traumatized by the experience.

“I fucking helped you MURDER him. Do you know how I feel now when I sleep at night?”

“I fucking helped you MURDER him. Do you know how I feel now when I sleep at night?” he tweeted. “Regardless that he was a terrorist and an animal I sure as fuck felt betrayed.”

Hussain was killed in Syria with a drone strike on August 24th, along with two of his body guards. Hussain was the leader of the Islamic State Hacking Division, a hacking crew with ties to ISIS. Before he was radicalized and travelled to Syria, Hussain was a member of a notorious hacktivist group called Team Poison (or TeaMp0isoN), which is how he came into 5hm00p’s orbit.

In his tweets, 5hm00p recalled being coerced to help the FBI once the agency threatened the livelihood of his family. The FBI had him attempt to entrap two of his friends with a wire while partying at the hacker conference Def Con in 2015, he said, with the goal of getting information on Hussain’s whereabouts.

An FBI spokesperson declined to comment. But a source with knowledge of the facts told Motherboard that 5hm00p did indeed help the US government locate Hussain.

Jaime Cochran, a security analyst and former member of Rustle League, told Motherboard that 5hm00p reached out to her after his Twitter confession to apologize, and shared with her some more information on
Quote 0 0
joeb
Link du jour

http://www.rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=10826

https://truthandshadows.wordpress.com/tag/barrie-zwicker/


Bonus read


“Snowden Effect” in Action: NSA Authority to Collect Bulk Phone
Metadata Expires


https://theintercept.com/2015/11/28/snowden-effect-in-action-nsa-authority-to-collect-bulk-phone-metadata-expires/



Nov. 28 2015, 6:14 p.m.

The National Security Agency no longer has legal authority to collect
phone metadata in bulk as of midnight, Saturday, November 28. The
executive branch previously claimed the government possessed such
authority under Section 215 of 2001’s USA PATRIOT Act, which gave the
FBI power to demand “any tangible things” needed “for an investigation
to obtain foreign intelligence information.” The FBI was thus able to
obtain the phone records of millions of Americans from U.S.
telecommunications companies and turn them over to the NSA.

The USA FREEDOM Act, signed into law on June 2 earlier this year, gave
the executive branch 180 days to wind down the bulk collection
program. According to the Tumblr of the Office of the Director of
National Intelligence, the government is “prohibited from collecting
telephone metadata records in bulk” starting November 29. The
executive branch will now be able to obtain phone metadata by asking
the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to order
telecommunications companies to turn over specific records.

The end of the bulk collection program is a modest but real victory
for former NSA contractor and whistleblower Edward Snowden, who
provided documents concerning the program to Laura Poitras and Glenn
Greenwald, co-founding editors of The Intercept. The first article by
Greenwald based on the documents leaked by Snowden, published on June
6, 2013, was about the bulk collection


1.

http://whowhatwhy.org/2015/11/27/the-cia-mafia-mexico-and-oswald-part-6/


The CIA, Mafia, Mexico — and Oswald, Part 6
David Atlee Phillips. Photo credit: Adapted by WhoWhatWhy from Shane
McBryde / YouTube.        
David Atlee Phillips. Photo credit: Adapted by WhoWhatWhy from Shane
McBryde / YouTube.

When John F. Kennedy was assassinated on November 22, 1963, the United
States lost more than its president. It lost its innocence. The
subsequent investigations into the young president’s killing raised
more questions than they answered — and caused Americans to lose faith
in their government. Indeed, for many people in the US and across the
world, the assassination marked the point at which their fundamental
perceptions changed.

Just after the Warren Commission released its report on the
assassination, the level of public trust in government was at 77
percent. A decade later it had plummeted to less than half that (36
percent).

Kennedy’s death and the circumstances surrounding it gave birth to a
movement. This movement, composed of all kinds of people, is dedicated
to investigating the story behind the story, to exposing the power
networks hidden beneath surface events. These machinations have been
dubbed “Deep Politics.” Those who study it believe there is much more
to national and world events than what the public is told by
government officials and evening newscasters — and, as you will see,
Peter Dale Scott proves it.

On the occasion of the anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination,
WhoWhatWhy is pleased to present excerpts from Chapter 2 of Scott’s
latest work – Dallas ’63: The First Deep State Revolt Against the
White House by Peter Dale Scott (Open Road Media, September, 2015).

For Part 1, please go here; Part 2 go here; Part 3 go here; Part 4 go
here; Part 5 go here.
The Sources of the Stories and the ZR/RIFLE Assassination Project

In the pages to follow, I shall show how Staff D, the small CIA unit
responsible for SIGINT (signals intelligence), and thus for electronic
intercept operations, was also the unit which housed the CIA’s
ZR/RIFLE assassination project. The Mexican DFS, which supplied the
raw intercept data to the CIA in Mexico City, also overlapped in many
ways with the Cubans and organized crime personnel picked for the
CIA-Mafia anti-Castro assassination plots.[163]

It is possible that the special circumstances in Mexico City explain
why the CIA’s generic assassination project, ZR/RIFLE, was housed
within the Staff D’s intercept operations. (“ZR” normally prefixed the
cryptonym for a intercept program.) In his hunt for killers, ZR/RIFLE
chief William Harvey searched for individuals with criminal
connections.[164] The Mexico City intercept operation against the
Soviet Embassy was by far the largest and most important CIA intercept
program anywhere in the world.[165]

And the DFS, the local intelligence service on which the CIA relied to
man its listening posts, was probably the intelligence service with
the profoundest links to the international drug traffic and to
American organized crime.

Morales was a CIA officer and killer who “was well known as the
Agency’s top assassin in Latin America.” He also openly described
Kennedy’s conduct during the Bay of Pigs operation as “traición
(betrayal).” According to a friend, Morales once ended an anti-Kennedy
tirade with the words, “Well, we took care of that son of a bitch,
didn’t we?”

For example, the brother-in-law of Luis Echeverría Alvarez, in 1963
the main liaison between Win Scott


2

Walmart Recruited FBI and Lockheed Intelligence Unit for Surveillance
of Employee Union Activity

Friday, November 27, 2015


http://www.allgov.com/news/controversies/walmart-recruited-fbi-and-lockheed-intelligence-unit-for-surveillance-of-employee-union-activity-151127?news=857944

When workers at Walmart tried to unionize two years ago, company
executives turned to a defense contractor and the FBI to keep track of
labor organizers and supporters.

Using documents obtained from the National Labor Relations Board
(NLRB), Bloomberg Businessweek reported the retail giant launched a
surveillance campaign targeting OUR Walmart, which organized protests
in 2013 against the company.

Walmart leadership was so concerned about the union activity that “it
hired an intelligence-gathering service from Lockheed Martin,
contacted the FBI, staffed up its labor hotline, ranked stores by
labor activity, and kept eyes on employees (and activists) prominent
in the group” Susan Berfield reported for Bloomberg Businessweek.

“We are fighting for all workers to be paid a fair wage and enough
hours to put food on the table and provide for our families,” Mary Pat
Tifft, a Wisconsin Walmart employee of 27 years, said, according to
Common Dreams. “To think that Walmart found us such a threat that they
would hire a defense contractor and engage the FBI is a mind-blowing
abuse of power.”

The media investigation into Walmart revealed that inside its global
security operation is an Analytical Research Center (ARC), led by a
former FBI officer, Ken Senser. And overseeing ARC is an executive,
Steve Dozier, who used to run the Arkansas State Police. Walmart is
headquartered in Bentonville, Arkansas.

ARC also took action the year before in 2012 when labor activists
talked about organizing strikes on Black Friday that year, which could
have hurt sales on one of the biggest shopping days of the year. “When
we received word of potential strikes and disruptive activity on Black
Friday 2012, that’s when we started to ask the ARC to work with us,”
Karen Casey, who was in charge of Walmart’s U.S. labor relations, told
the NLRB. “ARC had contracted with Lockheed leading up to Black Friday
to help source open social media sites.”

Additionally, a Lockheed analyst, Christian Blandford, monitored the
social media of activists in Bentonville before Walmart’s shareholder
meeting two years ago.

-Noel Brinkerhoff

To Learn More:

How Walmart Keeps an Eye on Its Massive Workforce (by Susan Berfield,
Bloomberg)

‘Mind-Blowing Abuse of Power’: Walmart Spied on Workers with FBI,
Lockheed Martin's Help (by Nadia Prupis, Common Dreams)

Labor Board Charges Wal-Mart with Illegally Firing and Punishing
Employees (by Noel Brinkerhoff, AllGov)

Largest Dutch Pension Fund Pulls Investments in Walmart over Poor
Labor Practices (by Noel Brinkerhoff and David Wallechinsky, AllGov).



3.


http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/courts/how-j-edgar-hoover-got-larkin-deported-from-us-34243183.html



How J Edgar Hoover got Larkin deported from US
Future FBI chief fabricated evidence to oust 'Big Jim' the agitator,
writes Emmet O'Connor
Emmet O'Connor

Published
29/11/2015 | 02:30

S

HERO’S WELCOME: Jim Larkin (centre) cuts a dour figure as he is
greeted by supporters on his return from America
1
HERO’S WELCOME: Jim Larkin (centre) cuts a dour figure as he is
greeted by supporters on his return from America

When we think of James Larkin, what probably comes to mind is the 1913
Lockout or the iconic statue on Dublin's O'Connell Street of 'Big Jim'
with arms aloft in the middle of one of his famous orations. We are
unlikely to consider - or perhaps we are even unaware of - the
considerable time he spent in the United States.



That Larkin's experience should intersect with the infamous figure of
J Edgar Hoover, who would later head the FBI, is something one would
never expect - but it did happen in 1923 when Hoover colluded in the
fabrication of evidence to achieve Larkin's deportation.

Crushed by the Lockout, Larkin had gone to the US in October 1914,
hoping to develop a new career as a globe-trotting agitator. In 1918
his James Connolly club in New York's Greenwich Village became the hub
of a campaign to turn the Socialist Party of America into a communist
party. Among his confederates was Jack Reed, just back from Russia and
soon to be the author of a celebrated account of the Bolshevik
revolution, Ten Days That Shook The World. When the red scare of 1919
led to arrests, Larkin was seen as one of the biggest fish in the net.

Hoover took a keen interest in his case. All this radicalism, he
thought, was due to foreign malcontents and the answer was
deportation. Even after Larkin was gaoled in 1920, Hoover complained
to the New York State Attorney that he was carrying out propaganda
work from prison.

Worse followed for Hoover. Imprisonment won Larkin worldwide sympathy
as a man punished for his beliefs rather than anything he said or did.
One of his many famous prison visitors was Charlie Chaplin. Jim's
brother, Pete, was invited to Hollywood to speak to stars like Charles
Ray and Milton Stills. Chaplin sent presents to Jim's wife, Elizabeth,
and her children in Dublin.

In January 1923, Al Smith, New York's first Irish-American governor,
was persuaded that Larkin was a political prisoner and had him
released from Sing Sing with a free pardon. Hoover immediately set
about preparing a case for deportation in collaboration with William J
Burns, Director of the Bureau of Investigation, later the FBI. The
problem was there was no evidence Larkin had advocated violence. Burns
collated reports from field offices and found that "certain statements
are quoted and attributed to Larkin but copies of the reports in which
the statements appear cannot be located".

On January 23, 1923, he wrote to his New York 'Special Agent in
Charge' asking if quotes attributed to Larkin at a meeting in the Odd
Fellows Hall, New York, in 1919 could be proven. Despite a negative
reply, Hoover offered to draft a deportation case for the Department
of Labor. To seal the case, Burns supplied the missing evidence,
alleging that at the Odd Fellows Hall, New York City, on February 16,
1919, Larkin appealed for money, using such slogans as 'Every Dollar
Kills the Capitalist'. This was hardly the required smoking gun, but
Burns told the Department of Labor: "... it is very evident that James
Larkin is a person who fully comes within the provisions of the
immigration law providing for deportation of an alien who advocates
the overthrow of the Government of the United States by force or
violence. It would be very desirable to effect his deportation at an
early date…"

A deportation warrant was issued on April 18.

Larkin was arrested on April 19, taken to Ellis Island and deported.

On Monday, April 30, he landed at Dun Laoghaire where his sister and
40 supporters greeted him. A few hours later, a crowd of 4,000
followed him to Liberty Hall. Home was the hero.

4.


http://www.41nbc.com/story/d/story/burger-king-manager-police-erased-video-of-chicago/10418/B4OhIpREU0S3XmDQSk0WNQ

Burger King manager: Police erased video of Chicago shooting
11/28/2015 08:05 PM
11/28/2015 08:07 PM

CHICAGO (AP) — A Burger King manager who accuses Chicago police of
erasing surveillance video in the case of a black teenager shot last
year by a white officer says he has testified before a federal grand
jury investigating the shooting.

Jay Darshane tells the Chicago Tribune that the FBI also took the
restaurant video recorder containing all of its surveillance images.

Federal prosecutors said this week that their investigation is
continuing, but would not comment further.

Under a judge's order, the city released police squad car video
showing the shooting of 17-year-old Laquan McDonald. Cook County
prosecutors also announced this week that the officer has been charged
with first-degree murder.
Quote 0 0
joeb

http://qz.com/562181/fbi-national-security-letter-nsl-information-no-warrant-needed/

Here is all the information the FBI can ask for without a warrant and without you even knowing


November 30 2015

Thanks to court documents released today (Nov. 30) Americans can for the first time glimpse one of the US government’s powerful surveillance tools: the National Security Letter, or NSL.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation sends out tens of thousands of these letters every year to financial institutions, travel agencies, telecommunications companies, and credit-reporting agencies demanding a wide range of information on the individual it is investigating, without a warrant from a judge. The Patriot Act, signed into law in 2001, drastically increased the FBI’s mandate to issue NSLs.

Nicholas Merrill filed a First Amendment lawsuit after receiving an NSL in 2004 regarding one of the customers of his New York internet and consulting business, Calyx Internet Access. A federal judge has now ordered the release of Merrill’s NSL, which was handed to him by an FBI agent along with an order not to discuss it with anyone.

Here is some of the information on his client that Merrill was ordered to hand over, per the unredacted document:

DSL account information
Subscriber name and related subscriber information
Addresses associated with the account
Subscriber day/evening telephone numbers
Screen names or other online names associated with the account
Order forms
Records relating to merchandise orders/shipping information for the last 180 days
All billing related to account
Internet Service Provider (ISP)
All email addresses associated with account
Internet Protocol (IP address) assigned to the account
All website information registered to the account
Uniform Resource Locator (URL) address assigned to the account
Any other information which you consider to be electronic communication transactional reco
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joeb


http://7thspace.com/headlines/521114/fbi_four_st_bernard_parish_correctional_officers_charged_with_violating_the_civil_rights_of_an_inmate_resulting_in_her_death.html


Four St. Bernard Parish Correctional Officers Charged with Violating the Civil Rights of an Inmate, Resulting in Her Death


WASHINGTON—A grand jury today indicted four correctional officers from the St. Bernard Parish Prison in Chalmette, Louisiana, for violating the civil rights of inmate Nimali Henry by deliberately ignoring serious medical needs that led to her death.
Quote 0 0
joeb

http://www.mypalmbeachpost.com/news/news/local-govt-politics/sheriffs-lack-of-attendance-at-meetings-questioned/npcdp/


CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMISSION
Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst

Posted: 8:52 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, 2015



WEST PALM BEACH —

When the Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission meets, you can count on six people, nearly a fifth of the panel, being prominently absent.

Four are federal law enforcement agents. One is Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw. And one is the county Clerk and Comptroller, Sharon Bock.
+Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst photo
Richard Graulich
Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw

Among them, the six have attended 37 of 284 meetings since 2007, for a combined attendance average of 13 percent, a Palm Beach Post analysis of attendance records shows.

By comparison, none of the remaining 26 members on the panel has an attendance record below 55 percent.

Furthermore, the difference between “public sector” and “private sector” members in attendance is striking. The 21 public sector members, from law enforcement, courts and local and federal government, have an average attendance of 53 percent. The 11 private sector members, selected by the Economic Council of Palm Beach County, average 85 percent.
+Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst photo
Damon Higgins
Palm Beach County Clerk & Comptroller Sharon Bock

The Criminal Justice Commission was created by the County Commission in 1988, at the behest of the Economic Council, to build partnerships among agencies to improve the county’s criminal justice system. Its “public sector” membership is automatically comprised of various law enforcement, judicial and government posts.

Bradshaw has attended 13 of the 72 meetings held during his terms in office, and Bock has gone to one of 70 meetings during her terms.

The four federal law enforcement officers are John McKenna, assistant special agent in charge at the West Palm Beach district office of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (attended 0 of 40 meetings held during the time he has been appointed to the board); Robert Shirley of the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (0 of 26); FBI agent Michael D’Alonzo (1 of 6); and Rolando Garcia of the U.S. Attorney’s Office (22 of 68).
+Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst photo
William Kramer, chairman, Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission

McKenna’s schedule has not allowed him to attend any of the justice panel meetings but he does attend Law Enforcement Planning Council meetings, DEA spokeswoman Anne-Judith Lambert said last month. ATF spokesman Carlos Gonzalez said Shirley “is just an honorary member” of the justice commission and also is a regular member of the Planning Council. In response to questions abut D’Alonzo’s record, FBI spokesman Michael Leverock said his office is “not in a position to discuss the schedule of our agents.” And Garcia’s office did not respond to requests for comment.

Attendance became an issue when, at a Nov. 13 meeting of some justice panel members, chair William Kramer and others asked about Bradshaw’s record.

“I think it’s really important that the chief law enforcement officer of the county attend.” said Kramer, a business consultant and a former general manager of Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative of Florida in Belle Glade.

Priscilla Taylor, who is the county commissioner on the criminal justice commission, said later she’s not convinced the absence of Bock and Bradshaw undermines the commission’s legitimacy. But, she said, “it sure would be nice if they were there.”

Bradshaw told The Post on Nov. 13 that he deliberately skips the meetings becauseof concerns about Florida’s Government in the Sunshine law and opening his constitutionally independent office to the scrutiny of the county Inspector General and Commission on Ethics. The Sunshine law argument is one he has made since at least 2010.

Both he and Bock have said that because their commission membership places them on the same public board as law enforcement colleagues, such as the State Attorney and Public Defender, they would in effect be violating the public meetings laws any time they discuss a pending criminal or civil case with each other outside of a publicly noticed board meeting.

But after The Post asked Bradshaw on Nov. 25 about a 2013 law that exempts the sheriff, clerk and others from public meeting requirements when discussing active criminal intelligence information or active investigations at criminal justice commission meetings, he said, “It wasn’t about the Sunshine Law because I knew that got rectified.”

Rather, Bradshaw repeated that he doesn’t want to be answerable to the county’s Inspector General and Ethics Commission.

“Those have never been resolved,” he said.

“The county wants to keep putting restrictions on the sheriff’s office,” Bradshaw said. He said he was “not going to allow the county commission to control the constitutional office of the sheriff.”

Bock also discounted the Sunshine Law issue last month. She said it’s a question of time.

“I have over 1,000 statutory duties as constitutional clerk and comptroller and I am a board member on countless committees both local and statewide,” Bock said.

State Rep. David Kerner, D-Lake Worth, himself a member of the Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission, is the legislator who pushed through the Sunshine Law exemption for criminal justice commission members. He said he wouldn’t second-guess Bradshaw’s and Bock’s decisions to err on the side of caution in attending meetings.

“It’s a decision they have to make individually,” Kerner said. “It’s not a blanket exemption.”

But Barbara Petersen, executive director of the First Amendment Foundation, a Tallahassee-based open-government advocate

CRIMINAL JUSTICE COMMISSION
Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst

Posted: 8:52 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, 2015
EmailFacebookTwitterShareThis

By Eliot Kleinberg and Mike Stucka - Palm Beach Post Staff Writer


WEST PALM BEACH —

When the Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission meets, you can count on six people, nearly a fifth of the panel, being prominently absent.

Four are federal law enforcement agents. One is Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw. And one is the county Clerk and Comptroller, Sharon Bock.
+Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst photo
Richard Graulich
Palm Beach County Sheriff Ric Bradshaw

Among them, the six have attended 37 of 284 meetings since 2007, for a combined attendance average of 13 percent, a Palm Beach Post analysis of attendance records shows.

By comparison, none of the remaining 26 members on the panel has an attendance record below 55 percent.

Furthermore, the difference between “public sector” and “private sector” members in attendance is striking. The 21 public sector members, from law enforcement, courts and local and federal government, have an average attendance of 53 percent. The 11 private sector members, selected by the Economic Council of Palm Beach County, average 85 percent.
+Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst photo
Damon Higgins
Palm Beach County Clerk & Comptroller Sharon Bock

The Criminal Justice Commission was created by the County Commission in 1988, at the behest of the Economic Council, to build partnerships among agencies to improve the county’s criminal justice system. Its “public sector” membership is automatically comprised of various law enforcement, judicial and government posts.

Bradshaw has attended 13 of the 72 meetings held during his terms in office, and Bock has gone to one of 70 meetings during her terms.

The four federal law enforcement officers are John McKenna, assistant special agent in charge at the West Palm Beach district office of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (attended 0 of 40 meetings held during the time he has been appointed to the board); Robert Shirley of the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (0 of 26); FBI agent Michael D’Alonzo (1 of 6); and Rolando Garcia of the U.S. Attorney’s Office (22 of 68).
+Sheriff’s lack of attendance at meetings questioned but he’s not worst photo
William Kramer, chairman, Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission

McKenna’s schedule has not allowed him to attend any of the justice panel meetings but he does attend Law Enforcement Planning Council meetings, DEA spokeswoman Anne-Judith Lambert said last month. ATF spokesman Carlos Gonzalez said Shirley “is just an honorary member” of the justice commission and also is a regular member of the Planning Council. In response to questions abut D’Alonzo’s record, FBI spokesman Michael Leverock said his office is “not in a position to discuss the schedule of our agents.” And Garcia’s office did not respond to requests for comment.

Attendance became an issue when, at a Nov. 13 meeting of some justice panel members, chair William Kramer and others asked about Bradshaw’s record.

“I think it’s really important that the chief law enforcement officer of the county attend.” said Kramer, a business consultant and a former general manager of Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative of Florida in Belle Glade.

Priscilla Taylor, who is the county commissioner on the criminal justice commission, said later she’s not convinced the absence of Bock and Bradshaw undermines the commission’s legitimacy. But, she said, “it sure would be nice if they were there.”

Bradshaw told The Post on Nov. 13 that he deliberately skips the meetings becauseof concerns about Florida’s Government in the Sunshine law and opening his constitutionally independent office to the scrutiny of the county Inspector General and Commission on Ethics. The Sunshine law argument is one he has made since at least 2010.

Both he and Bock have said that because their commission membership places them on the same public board as law enforcement colleagues, such as the State Attorney and Public Defender, they would in effect be violating the public meetings laws any time they discuss a pending criminal or civil case with each other outside of a publicly noticed board meeting.

But after The Post asked Bradshaw on Nov. 25 about a 2013 law that exempts the sheriff, clerk and others from public meeting requirements when discussing active criminal intelligence information or active investigations at criminal justice commission meetings, he said, “It wasn’t about the Sunshine Law because I knew that got rectified.”

Rather, Bradshaw repeated that he doesn’t want to be answerable to the county’s Inspector General and Ethics Commission.

“Those have never been resolved,” he said.

“The county wants to keep putting restrictions on the sheriff’s office,” Bradshaw said. He said he was “not going to allow the county commission to control the constitutional office of the sheriff.”

Bock also discounted the Sunshine Law issue last month. She said it’s a question of time.

“I have over 1,000 statutory duties as constitutional clerk and comptroller and I am a board member on countless committees both local and statewide,” Bock said.

State Rep. David Kerner, D-Lake Worth, himself a member of the Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission, is the legislator who pushed through the Sunshine Law exemption for criminal justice commission members. He said he wouldn’t second-guess Bradshaw’s and Bock’s decisions to err on the side of caution in attending meetings.

“It’s a decision they have to make individually,” Kerner said. “It’s not a blanket exemption.”

But Barbara Petersen, executive director of the First Amendment Foundation, a Tallahassee-based open-government advocate
Quote 0 0
joeb
Inside the Mob: Fresh appeals in 2003 Al Bruno murder case yield new information, New York lawyer flags new 'Whitey Bulger' as John Bologna


http://www.masslive.com/news/index.ssf/2015/12/inside_the_mob_fresh_appeals_i.html


December 7 2015

SPRINGFIELD — It's been a dozen years since this city was roiled by a Mafia-fueled crime spree that peaked with the 2003 murders of crime boss Adolfo "Big Al" Bruno and low-level associate Gary Westerman.

Bruno was killed "cowboy style" in a downtown parking lot by a paid gunman bent on revenge, at the behest of scheming gangsters intent on a power play. Westerman was shot, smashed in the head with a shovel and dumped in a ditch in Agawam by fellow criminals he believed were his allies.

It's been four years since three men were tried, convicted and sentenced to life in prison for their respective roles in one or both killings. Onetime acting Genovese crime family boss Arthur "Artie" Nigro, formerly of Bronx, NY, and West Springfield brothers Fotios "Freddy" and Ty Geas stood trial in U.S. District Court in New York City in 2011. They were found guilty by a jury of a host of crimes including murder, racketeering and extortion.

The government made its case with three of the defendants' co-conspirators. They included two "made guys" in the Genovese-afilliated Springfield Crew plus one "crash dummy" from Westfield who carried out violent crimes for them. Nigro was pulling the strings in New York and gave the green-light for Bruno's murder, witnesses said.

The multi-state prosecution decimated Greater Springfield's organized crime terrain and temporarily jammed a lid on its trappings: extortion, widespread sports-betting and a general bully culture.

But all the years that have passed and law enforcement manpower aside, the case is still, in theory, a live issue. Freddy Geas filed a motion to vacate his sentence in May, arguing his defense had been hampered by ineffective counsel and that he had been robbed of a plea deal, among other things. His motion was rudimentary and boilerplate, clearly written by the hand of a penniless inmate serving a life sentence in a high-security prison in West Virginia with the possible assist of jailhouse lawyers.

Nigro's motion, on the other hand, was persuasively written and carefully prepared by prominent Wall Street lawyer Ruth Liebesman. It was filed in June. It offers a list of exhibits that provides a rare glimpse into law enforcement's handling of informants: namely John Bologna, a mid-level New York gangster who bounced between crime families while an informant for the FBI; and James Santaniello, Springfield's version of Howard Hughes - wealthy, stealthy and somewhat reclusive, also a law enforcement mole.

Obtained by The Republican, the material will be highlighted over four stories.

Liebesman's motion argues that despite having three attorneys at trial, Nigro received a woefully inadequate defense. According to Nigro, wily federal prosecutors dumped thousands of pages of witness testimony "on the eve of trial" with hidden gems of exculpatory evidence inside, which were all but unmanageable given the timeline.

Buried in this information are previously undisclosed details about Santaniello's business holdings, his coziness with authorities - plus Bologna's longtime deception straddling the mob world and his partnership with the Feds.

The onetime Bronx boss argues that his trial counsel fell short, first, by failing to make more hay with the cross-examination of Bologna, Nigro's former right hand who was secretly working as an FBI informant since 1996 while committing all the crimes gangsters cling to. It took 14 years for the Feds to disavow him, and, only after his role in the Bruno murder conspiracy came to light through other witnesses.

"Bologna was the FBI's New York office's answer to Whitey Bulger, the crime lord who committed and ordered numerous murders and acts of violence while an FBI informant in Boston over a period of many years," Liebesman's motion reads.
"Bologna was the FBI's New York office's answer to Whitey Bulger ..." ~ Attorney Ruth Liebesman

James "Whitey" Bulger, is serving a life sentence for 19 murders he committed while heading up Boston's Irish Mob crew, the Winter Hill Gang. Bulger committed crimes unchecked while acting as an informant for the FBI and feeding federal authorities information on his rivals in the Italian Mafia.

His former handler, John Connolly, also a childhood friend, is serving a 40-year prison sentence in connection with his ties to Bulger and the Winter Hill Gang. Connolly was in 1999 convicted of tipping Bulger to pending investigations and indictments, which prompted Bulger to flee Boston in 1994. Bulger remained in hiding at the top of the FBI's Most Wanted list until 2011, when he and his girlfriend were captured in California.

There have been no accusations that the FBI in New York knew about Bologna's specific criminal dealings in Western Massachusetts. An agent testified at Nigro's trial that Bologna simply hid things and lied to the agency during dozens of briefings. However, previous reports law enforcement indicate Bologna was tipped to an investigation into Mafia figures in Greater Springfield, where he had been regularly visiting in 2002, and abruptly stopped traveling here.

Liebesman argues in her motion that Bologna was the one who ordered the hit on Bruno - not Nigro - and orchestrated a myriad of extortion schemes in Springfield after Bruno was appointed b
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joeb
The FBI Won’t Confirm or Deny Buying Hacking Team Spyware, Even Though It Did

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-fbi-wont-confirm-or-deny-buying-hacking-team-spyware-even-though-it-did



December 9, 2015 // 11:35 AM EST

The FBI really doesn’t want to talk about its business with the Italian surveillance tech company Hacking Team.

On November 30, the FBI rejected a Freedom of Information (FOIA) request for every contract and any internal record between the Bureau and Hacking Team’s US-based reseller Cicom USA. Motherboard had filed the request in April, long before any trace of the FBI’s relationship with Hacking Team ever surfaced. At the time, a source told me that Hacking Team had sold to the FBI, and not just the Drug Enforcement Agency, as Motherboard revealed in an investigation published in April.

In its rejection, the Bureau said it can “neither confirm nor deny” the existence of any records.

Yet, thanks to the massive hack suffered by Hacking Team in July, we know very well that the FBI was among the company’s clients.

The leak contains the receipts issued by Hacking Team, through its US-based reseller Cicom USA, to the FBI for the sale of the spyware suite RCS. Files titled “Receipt Cicom USA x FBI” detail exactly how much the FBI spent on the company’s spyware since 2011 (more than $775,000). And despite the fact that Hacking Team’s CEO David Vincenzetti insisted that employees used the codename “PHOEBE” to refer to the FBI, many weren’t too careful.

“It’s hard to answer your question if I don’t know who Phoebe is,” wrote an Hacking Team executive to an account manager in 2012.

The manager responded: “FBI.”

And documents are littered with explicit references to the FBI, and a client list reveals who the code actually belongs to.

Hacking Team employees also regularly talked about the FBI in their internal emails.

“Phoebe is doing fine with her new toy,” Alex Velasco, Hacking Team’s sales representative in the US, who also headed Cicom USA, wrote in an email.

Hacking Team even issued certificates of trainings to an FBI agent. The certificates were issued to a “Mick” Houck after the agent completed a training to learn how to use RCS in 2012, and are part of the leak. According to leaked emails, an FBI agent called James Houck was in touch with Hacking Team. The agent signed his emails “Mick.”

Houck actively used Hacking Team’s spyware at least in one occasion in 2014, according to the emails.

“We have a case where we want to use the [Internet Explorer] delivery feature,” Houck wrote to Hacking Team’s support in 2013. “Could you tell me the process for deploying with this method. I thin
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joeb
couple of reads about cops dealing and using drugs

http://stopthedrugwar.org/taxonomy/term/27


that is why we need more police

1.

December 10 2015



Officer arrested on drug charges

Jordan allegedly on duty and dressed in uniform at time of undercover buy

http://www.kokomotribune.com/news/local_news/officer-arrested-on-drug-charges/article_1f8921fe-93a0-5651-820b-a8f7886a4b6f.html?mode=jqm



2.
FBI agent Scott Bowman who stole heroin sentenced to 3 years in prison - The ...
https://www.washingtonpost.com/...fbi-agent...stole.../5bd82e8c-262c-11e5...
Jul 9, 2015 - A onetime FBI agent who fed his drug addiction by stealing heroin seized as evidence in criminal cases was sentenced Thursday to three years ...



3.

FBI agent steals drugs from Silk Road




4.

Fired FBI agent accused of stealing $100000 in drug money
http://www.pe.com/articles/money-769020-counts-agent.html
Jun 4, 2015 - MORENO VALLEY: Former FBI agent accused of stealing $100000 in drug money | money, counts, agent, fbi, stealing, valley, former, drug, one
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joeb
http://whowhatwhy.org/2015/12/17/protecting-fbi-whistleblowers-from-retaliation/


December 17, 2015 | Klaus Marre
Protecting FBI Whistleblowers from Retaliation
Whistleblower report chart of complaints. Photo credit: Adapted by WhoWhatWhy from U.S. Government Accountability Office and adil113 / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)        
Whistleblower report chart of complaints. Photo credit: Adapted by WhoWhatWhy from U.S. Government Accountability Office and adil113 / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

There are few things in Washington that garner bipartisan support these days. Protecting Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) whistleblowers is now on that short list.

On Thursday, the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee and the ranking Democrat on the panel jointly introduced legislation to better shield from retaliation Bureau employees who report waste, fraud or misconduct. FBI whistleblowers are among the most poorly protected in the federal workforce.

“It’s no secret that FBI whistleblowers often face harsh consequences for simply trying to address failures or misconduct at work,” Judiciary Committee Chairman and frequent FBI critic Chuck Grassley (R-IA) said.

“Inconsistent and confusing disclosure rules and perpetual delays in retaliation investigations have left well-intentioned whistleblowers without adequate protections from reprisal.”

Former agent Michael German, a 16-year veteran of the Bureau, is one of the best-known FBI whistleblowers and his case illustrates that retaliation against those speaking out could weaken national security.

“I experienced two years of sustained and collaborative retaliation that pushed me out of the FBI, despite a career of superior performance and an unblemished disciplinary record…”

“I know the toll exacted on whistleblowers because I resigned from the FBI after this system failed to protect me from retaliation for internally reporting a mismanaged terrorism investigation,” German testified before the committee earlier this year.

After reporting the problem, he was ostracized from further participation in that investigation (which was in Tampa, Florida) and, it was threatened, he may never be allowed to work undercover again. Not long afterward, German was informed that he was being investigated for unauthorized travel and for spending $50 in case funds — a probe that was apparently bogus, and was later dismissed.

“In effect, the Inspectors had performed a retaliatory investigation against me on behalf of the Tampa managers involved in my complaint,” German testified. “I believe the only reason they told me they did this investigation was to warn me they would entertain even the pettiest allegations against me if I continued pursuing the whistleblower complaint.”

In addition, the FBI officials German had complained about were informed of the complaint — and who made it.

And, after he began working on a different terrorism probe, in Portland, Oregon, an assistant director of the Bureau’s Office of Professional Responsibility (OPR) told the case agent and the supervisor that German’s involvement in the investigation was “problematic” — because he was a whistleblower. OPR is the entity supposed to handle whistleblower complaints.

“While these concerns might seem cynical, I experienced two years of sustained and

collaborative retaliation that pushed me out of the FBI, despite a career of superior performance

and an unblemished disciplinary record,” German testified. “High-level FBI officials who had nothing to do with the original complaint initiated adverse personnel actions against me because they heard I was a whistleblower.”

Grassley hopes his legislation — the FBI Whistleblower Protection Enhancement Act — will help agents like German who have the courage to come forward and report problems. It would not only expand outlets for protected disclosures but also improve the process to halt reprisals.

Earlier this year, the Government Accountability Office determined that the FBI awarded corrective actions in only 3 out of 62 whistleblower retaliation complaints.

Some of the complaints were dismissed in part because the whistleblowers had reported a problem to somebody in their chain of command who “was not one of the nine high-level FBI or DOJ entities designated under DOJ regulations to receive such disclosures.”

In other words, whistleblowers were not protected from retaliatory actions simply because they went to the wrong person with their complaint.

The new bill would change that by extending whistleblower protections to FBI employees who make disclosures to their supervisors. It would also make clear that Bureau staff can take their complaints directly to members of Congress.

“Whistleblowers serve an essential role in providing transparency and accountability in the Federal government,” said ranking Judiciary Committee Democrat Patrick Leahy (VT). “It is important that all government employees are provided with strong and effective avenues to come forward with evidence of government abuse and misuse, and that they have protections from retaliation.”

The bill would also end the practice of the Bureau itself investigating FBI whistleblower complaints. Instead, all cases will be investigated by the Inspector General of the Department of Justice (DOJ), which will issue annual reports on the outcomes.

Even FBI Director James Comey appeared to agree that Bureau employees blowing the whistle must be protected.

“I think it’s very, very important that we create the safe zones that all of our people need to raise concerns that they might have,” Comey said at a December 9 committee hearing; he pledged to work with the lawmakers on strengthening those protections.

With the various problems that have plagued the FBI over the years, and which have been detailed by WhoWhatWhy (for example here, here, and here) as well as by Grassley, stronger whistleblower protection will improve accountability at the Bureau and give the public more confidence in the justice system.
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joeb



http://chicago.suntimes.com/opinion/7/71/1192382/editorial-53


Editorial: DHS hounding of Mich. man is a mistake
: 12/20/2015, 04:00pm




Somebody should tell the U.S. government to stop coming after Ibrahim Parlak, who has run a popular Middle Eastern restaurant in Michigan’s Harbor Country since he came to America from Turkey and was granted asylum in 1991.

Lots of influential figures have rallied around Parlak over the years, including former U.S. Sen. Carl Levin, D-Mich., U.S. Rep Fred Upton, R-Mich., U.S. Rep. Jan Schakowsky, D-Ill., author Alex Kotlowitz, and Chicago journalists Carol Marin and the late Roger Ebert.

At least one dead in collision on Las Vegas strip
Miss Universe mistake crowns the wrong contestant

His legal team includes John Smietanka, the former United States attorney for Western Michigan, appointed by presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, and Anne Buckleitner, former counsel to the FBI in areas of counter-intelligence and terrorism.

EDITORIAL



Parlak has been a model immigrant and is well respected in his community. But something shadowy in the federal bureaucracy keeps labeling Parlak as a terrorist, as if the government just can’t admit it’s been wrong.

He spent 10 months in jail in 2004-05, until a judge freed him. Now, his lawyers worry he might be whisked away on Dec. 23 under an existing removal order. That would be unconscionable.

Parlak is told that the U.S. has obtained travel documents to Turkey for him. If he signs them, he could be put on a plane to Turkey. If he refuses, he violates his order of supervision.

Here’s the shadowy part: Parlak’s lawyers say they’ve received a back-channel offer of a two-year extension on his authorization to remain in America if he refuses to sign the travel documents. But no one will put anything in writing. Is he being set up? No one knows.

The supposed evidence tying Parlak to a Kurdish organization — one that was reclassified a terrorist outfit after he was already in America — comes through a now discredited and disbanded Turkish military tribunal that extracted statements via torture. No one vouches for the tribunal, but somehow its work lives on.

Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson ought to step in and clear this up. Or, as Geoffrey Stone of the University
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joeb






For 55 officers involved in fatal shootings this year, it wasn’t their first time


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/for-55-officers-involved-in-fatal-shootings-this-year-it-wasnt-their-first-time/2015/12/22/435cb680-9d04-11e5-a3c5-c77f2cc5a43c_story.html?hpid=hp_hp-top-table-main_coprepeaters-235pm%3Ahomepage%2Fstory


December 22 at 2:11 PM

Jorge Ramirez Sr., 58, speaks as Xavier Gonzalez, 13, and Nicole Ramirez, 30, look on in Los Angeles. The three are family members of Jorge Ramirez, an unarmed police informant who was killed by police in Bakersfield, Calif., when a wanted man he was with opened fire on officers. (Patrick T. Fallon/For The Washington Post)

More than 50 police officers involved in fatal shootings this year had previously fired their guns in deadly on-duty shootings, according to a Washington Post investigation.

For a handful of officers, it was their third fatal shooting. For one officer, it was his fourth.

The findings concerned many law enforcement experts, who said that most officers never fire their weapons on the job. The analysis also exposed another gap in the federal government’s oversight of fatal police shootings nationwide: the absence of a system for tracking multiple shootings by individual officers.

The 55 officers were identified as part of a Post project tracking all fatal shootings by police in the line of duty in 2015. It is the first nationwide attempt to determine whether fatal police shootings are isolated events in an officer’s career or whether some officers repeatedly fire their weapons in deadly encounters.

The Post also found that an additional 45 officers had previously been involved in non-fatal shootings.

“It’s a national embarrassment. We don’t even know how many times cops pull their triggers,” said Geoffrey Alpert, a criminologist at the University of South Carolina.

In most cases, the person killed was armed and the shootings were found to be justified by authorities or were still under investigation. The shootings cut across departments of all sizes, involved officers on a variety of assignments and grew out of circumstances such as routine patrols, undercover police operations and standoffs with SWAT teams that spanned hours.
At least 62 people have been shot and killed by police across the United States within the past 30 days, according to Washington Post data. View Graphic

In Broward County, Fla., a sheriff’s deputy on a SWAT team was involved in three fatal shootings from 2009 to 2011. His fourth came in June when officers shot and killed a suspected bank robber.

In San Bernardino, Calif., five officers opened fire in February, killing a man who led police on a high-speed chase and then tried to ram their cars. For two of the officers, it was their third fatal shooting with the department; and for another, his second.

And in New Mexico, five state police officers who were involved in fatal shootings in 2015 also fired their weapons in earlier encounters in which police killed someone. One of those officers took part in two fatal shootings this year — six weeks apart. Both involved standoffs with armed individuals.

Many departments withheld officers’ names from the public or released only vague details, making it impossible to precisely determine how many officers have been involved in multiple shootings.

[More than 950 people fatally shot by police this year]

Policing experts said the phenomenon has not been deeply studied nationwide, and a deeper review of the cases could root out officers who resort too often to deadly force and help officials develop strategies for officers to defuse — or a
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joeb

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/dec/30/belgian-soldiers-police-held-orgy-during-brussels-lockdown


Belgian soldiers and police 'held orgy' during Brussels lockdown

Two policewomen and eight soldiers alleged to have engaged in group sex while colleagues hunted for Paris terror attack suspects
Police officers in Brussels


Police officers in Brussels, which was on the highest level of alert last month following the Paris attacks. Photograph: Francois Lenoir/Reuters







Wednesday 30 December 2015 12.43 EST
Last modified on Wednesday 30 December 2015 17.00 EST



Soldiers and police officers in Brussels held an orgy while the city was in lockdown over fears of a Paris-style attack by Islamist extremists, according to Belgian media reports.

Two female police officers and eight soldiers are said to have engaged in group sex at a police station in the Brussels neighbourhood of Ganshoren while colleagues hunted for terror suspects.

The police station was near Molenbeek, where anti-terror raids had been taking place.

Police spokesman Johan Berckmans told De Standaard that 15 to 20 soldiers slept at the station for two weeks during the operation in November so they did not have to travel far at the end of their shift.

“When they left, they organised a small party to thank the police in the area,” the spokesman told Belgian newspaper La Derniere Heure.

“We have launched an investigation to find out what exactly happened.”

The Belgian capital was on the highest level of alert last month after the Paris attacks that left 130 people
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joeb



http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/kelly-deleted-emails-don-hurt-case-nypd-quotas-article-1.2486840


Raymond Kelly's deleted emails don't mean the NYPD quota system doesn't exist, judge rules

Tuesday, January 5, 2016, 11:58 PM



Just because there’s no NYPD paperwork on quotas doesn't mean such a system didn’t exist, a judge said in a ruling Tuesday that hammers the city.

Manhattan Federal Court Judge Robert Sweet lambasted the NYPD’s scrubbing of documents that could be relevant in a class-action case alleging a summons quota system. But Sweet stopped short of saying the deletion was deliberate
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joeb








Making a Murderer depicts miscarriages of justice that are not at all rare



http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jan/06/making-a-murder-netflix-series-miscarriages-of-justice-are-not-at-all-rare


All the cloak-and-dagger undermining that happens to the Netflix series defendant is par for the course in the US criminal justice system

Wednesday 6 January 2016 07.15 EST
Last modified on Wednesday 6 January 2016 07.43 EST



If you take one thing away from binge-watching Netflix’s Making a Murderer besides sympathy for its protagonists, make it this: the events of the film, in which two men may have been framed for murder, aren’t an isolated case – the criminal “justice” system actively works against innocent people and prevents justice all the time. And in many ways, that is by design.
Making a Murderer: directors say juror told them Steven Avery was framed
Read more

The 10-hour, 10-episode film follows the story of Steve Avery, a Wisconsin native who spent 18 years in jail after being wrongly convicted of rape in 1985. After the real culprit was found and he was exonerated, he found himself re-arrested and tried for murder in a separate case a short time later, under extremely suspicious circumstances that strongly suggest he was framed by the local sheriff’s office while prosecutors looked the other way.

One of the most gut-wrenching scenes is when one of the characters, Brendan Dassey – Avery’s cousin, who is a shy and sad teenager with mental difficulties – is coerced into confessing to the murder that is the subject of the majority of the documentary. His
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joeb
The FBI's control of the legal system is extensive and real.



as always funded by your tax dime



two stories


1.



http://www.jamestownsun.com/news/nation-and-world/3918458-us-judge-tosses-99-million-suit-family-whitey-bulger-victim




U.S. judge tosses $9.9 million suit by family of 'Whitey' Bulger victim
Jan 6, 2016 at 3:00 p.m.

BOSTON - Family members of one of former Boston mob boss James "Whitey" Bulger's murder victims have no right to sue the U.S. government for $9.9 million for failing to let them know he had been buried in an unmarked beachfront grave, a federal judge ruled.





2.


see

https://books.google.com/books?id=I9vR0wXng60C&pg=PA388&lpg=PA388&dq=alec+charns+fbi&source=bl&ots=iJp_U9Y3mN&sig=inmsovt3Av5bvaV4SmoVd5sLJIA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjFruHH8JrKAhVCVyYKHbtsD38Q6AEIPTAI#v=onepage&q=alec%20charns%20fbi&f=false



Senator Sam Ervin, Last of the Founding Fathers
https://books.google.com/books?isbn=1458722317
Karl E. Campbell - 2009 - ‎Biography & Autobiography
The special treatment many members of Congress afforded the FBI is discussed ... See Alex Charns, “FBI Had Sam Ervin Wondering,” Durham Morning-Herald, ...

see




http://s1.zetaboards.com/Liestoppers_meeting/topic/4756329/1/



Alex Charns interview (2007) - ZetaBoards
s1.zetaboards.com › ... › DUKE LACROSSE - Liestoppers
Apr 9, 2012 - 9 posts - ‎1 author
Last Friday, I interviewed (emails) Alex Charns, a Durham attorney and ..... Cloak and Gavel: FBI Wiretaps, Bugs, Informers, and the Supreme ...





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joeb
https://photographyisnotacrime.com/2016/01/arizona-senator-john-kavanagh-wants-to-make-it-illegal-to-record-cops-including-personal-interactions/


Arizona Senator John Kavanagh Wants to Make it Illegal to Record Cops, Including Personal Interactions - PINAC News

Oblivious to the backlash that left a Texas politician looking like an unconstitutional buffoon last year, an Arizona senator is proposing to make it illegal to record cops from within 20 feet. John Kavanagh, a republican who is also a retired cop, said such a law is necessary for officer safety. He said he does not see a problem that such a law would make it illegal for citizens to record their own interactions with police, stressing that citizens do not have that right, despite the numerous court rulings that disagree.
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joeb
http://www.occurrencesforeigndomestic.com/



Also see


http://sjlendman.blogspot.com/2016/01/e ... drugs.html

Sunday, January 10, 2016
El Chapo v. Longstanding CIA Global Drugs Trafficking

El Chapo v. Longstanding CIA Global Drugs Trafficking

by Stephen Lendman

Drug lords come and go, El Chapo’s arrest of little consequence, doing nothing to stem the flow of illicit drugs. Business as usual continues.

His operation and others like his pale compared to CIA global drugs trafficking - a topic media scoundrels won’t touch.

Its involvement began in 1947, its first year of existence. In his book titled “The Politics of Heroin: CIA Complicity in the Global Drug Trade,” Alfred McCoy documented CIA and US government complicity in drugs trafficking at the highest official levels.

It continues today in Asia, Europe, the Middle East, South and Central America, facilitating the global supply of illicit drugs.

Gary Webb’s expose of CIA involvement in Nicaraguan drugs trafficking, supporting the contras, dealing with Los Angeles crack dealers, made him a target for vicious vilification - hounding him out of journalism into deep depression, either committing suicide or succumbing to foul play.

He regularly received death threats. Credible sources believe he was murdered to silence him. Unidentified individuals were seen breaking into and leaving his residence before his demise.

In his books and other writings, Peter Dale Scott explained “(s)ince at least 1950 there has been a global CIA-drug connection operating more or less continuously” to this day.

“The global drug connection is not just a lateral connection between CIA field operatives and their drug-trafficking contacts.”

“It is more significantly a global financial complex of hot money uniting prominent business, financial and government, as well as underworld figures,” a sort of “indirect empire (operating alongside) existing government.”

Iran-Contra and Afghan opium cultivation for global heroin trafficking are two among numerous other examples.

Hundreds of billions of dollars of annual revenues are produced - a US government-supported bonanza for the CIA, organized crime and Western financial institutions, heavily involved in money laundering.

A 1996 Peter Dale Scott affidavit on CIA drugs trafficking explained his research into longstanding US government involvement.

“(G)overnments themselves, and the links they develop with major traffickers, are the key both to the drug-trafficking problem and to its solution,” he explained.

America is one of numerous governments involved, the most harmful and disturbing because of its imperial power and global reach, influencing or affecting virtually everything worldwide.

A 2013 UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC) World Drug Report called Israel a majo
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joeb







https://www.rawstory.com/2016/01/police-chiefs-accuse-ohio-sheriff-of-posing-as-dea-rep-to-steal-drugs-from-their-departments/



Police chiefs accuse Ohio sheriff of posing as DEA rep to steal drugs from their departments




10 Jan 2016 at 22:55 ET


A group of Ohio police chiefs claim that a local sheriff stole drugs from their departments, falsely claiming that he was collecting the illegal substances for disposal by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). The police chiefs also claim that state officials stalled an investigation into the matter for political reasons.

According to the Free Thought Project, Sandusky County Sheriff Kyle Overmyer met with Police Chief Mark Kaufman at Bellevue Police Department in April of 2015. Overmyer said he was collecting drugs for disposal by the DEA.
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Kaufman was new to his job at the time. He told the Sandusky Register that unbeknownst to him, Overmyer had visited the department on two other occasions to collect DEA drug boxes.

“Well, I didn’t realize he had been there the other two times,” Kaufman said. “And my detective didn’t think anything of it. It was the sheriff picking up these things. He told us – he told me personally – he had an agreement with DEA and just kept it in whatever facility he had, and he said they come and pick it up a couple times a year.”

Then Kaufman compared notes with other police chiefs in the region and found that they’d had similar experiences. So, he contacted the DEA.

“When I talked to DEA the next day, I learned that the sheriff in fact did not have an agreement with them, and secondly that they told me they had discontinued the pick-ups a couple years ago, and that they were starting again,” he said.

The group of police chiefs then contacted the Ohio Bureau Criminal Investigation (BCI) and state Attorney General Mike DeWine. They say they were assured by the BCI that an investigation into Overmyer was ongoing.

However, DeWine alleges that no such contact occurred and that he knew nothing about accusations against Overmyer at the time the chiefs suggest.

The group of police chiefs have repeatedly prodded BCI to pursue a case against Overmyer to no avail. The investigation allegedly relaunches, then the group hears nothing, said Gibsonburg Police Chief Paul Whitaker.

“BCI has been given ample time and opportunity, more chances to conduct an investigation than we ever get in cases,” Whitaker said. “And then we start to get word that possibly the police chiefs are assisting some way in covering up for Sheriff Overmyer, which is bullshit.”

Last Friday, the group — Fremont Police Chief James White, Bellevue Police Chief Mark Kaufman, Gibsonburg Police Chief Paul Whitaker, Green Springs Police Chief Charles Horne, Clyde Police Chief Bruce Gower, and Woodville Police Chief Roy Whitehead — released a statement detailing their accusations against Overmyer.

The case is currently ongoing.

Watch video about this story, embedded below:

Part One:

Part Two:

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joeb


http://m.wvtm13.com/news/Ex-police-chief-convicted-of-illegally-selling-ammunition/37413098


Police chief convicted of illegally selling ammunition
Published On: Jan 13 2016 10:39:01 AM EST
Handcuffs
MONTGOMERY, Ala -

Federal prosecutors say a former Alabama police chief has been convicted of selling ammunition to a man who was living in the country illegally.

Authorities said in a statement Monday that former Franklin police chief Michael Clements ran a side business selling electronics and more from his home while he worked as police chief.

Prosecutors say the FBI and Auburn Police began investigating Clements after receiving information that he was selling stolen property and firearms.

Prosecutors say a confidential informant bought a stolen laptop from Clements and got video of Clements selling a firearm and ammunition to a Mexican national.
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joeb






Google employee Sarmad Gilani says an SFPD officer and an FBI agent questioned him as part of a vague anti-terestigation.


January 14, 2016 9:39 am



http://www.sfexaminer.com/legal-aid-groups-sfpd-violated-city-law-barring-certain-cooperation-with-fbi/

The San Francisco Police Department may be blocking an investigation into allegations that an officer violated city law while working with a federal anti-terror agent, according to a letter sent to Chief Greg Suhr this week.

The letter, written by a group of legal aid law firms, says they have evidence that the police department has broken city law which bars police from contacting residents who are deemed suspicious by federal authorities.

As part of the 2012 Safe San Francisco Civil Rights Ordinance — inspired by documents that showed the FBI had been illegally spying on Muslims in the Bay Area with the aid of police — the department is required to report annually on its activity with the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force and is not allowed in most cases to participate in federal investigations into constitutionally protected acts.

“Overall we are extremely concerned that the ordinance has been violated and continues to be violated despite the report’s assurances to the contrary,” said the letter from the Asian Law Caucus, Council on American-Islamic relations and the Arab Resource and Organizing Center.

The letter indicated that Executive Director of the Office of Citizen Complaints Joyce Hicks said last week that the OCC was seeking advice on its “ability to interview the officer.”

“This strongly suggests that someone — SFPD or the FBI — denied access to the officer, thereby clearly playing SFPD in position of policy violation,” said the letter.

OCC had no comment on the issue as it pertains to an open investigation.

The department said in its annual report it could not comment on the OCC investigation since it was ongoing. But it did divulge some details about its activity with the JTTF: one officer works with the JTTF and there were 35 cases handled over the past year, but no city laws or police department
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joeb








Bland lawyers: Hold FBI in contempt for not producing Rangers report


http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Bland-family-Hold-FBI-in-contempt-for-not-6762792.php


January 15, 2016 Updated: January 15, 2016 8:15pm



Lawyers for Sandra Bland's mother and estate want a federal judge to hold FBI officials in contempt for not producing a Texas Rangers investigative report about the 28-year-old's arrest after a traffic stop last July, detention and death in a Waller County jail cell.

According to court papers, the FBI said it initially couldn't release any documents without the consent of the Texas Department of Public Safety, which includes the Rangers. Then, according to a brief filed by U.S. Attorney Ken Magidson, the FBI declined because the state had asked for a stay in the wrongful death lawsuit brought by the Bland family pending the outcome of a criminal perjury case against the arresting officer, Trooper Brian Encinia.

A government response also expresses surprise that Encinia was indicted. He has denied the charges.

As of late Friday, Cannon Lambert, who is among the lawyers representing the plaintiffs, said his legal team had not received the report.

The plaintiffs' 13-page motion, filed Thursday, asked the court to hold an FBI lawyer and support technician in contempt for failing to provide items listed in a subpoena, including all electronic recordings and reports "that in any way reference Sandra Bland."

The plaintiffs are also asking for a DVR control box and hard drive that the FBI "may have taken possession of," which could contain "original video footage of the Waller County jail at the times relevant to this litigation."
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joeb



couple of Sweedish Collars





1.



http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/world/europe/article4666617.ece


Swedish police admit race cover-up on crime
Communities across Sweden are struggling to cope with an influx of migrants that is higher per capita than in Germany


A tightening of border controls closer to the promised lands of Germany and Sweden has left thousands trapped and destitute
Communities across Sweden are struggling to cope with an influx of migrants that is higher per capita than in Germany
Published at 12:01AM, January 16 2016

Fears that the popularity of a Swedish far-right anti-immigrant party would soar persuaded police to suppress details of migrant involvement in crime, officials have admitted.

As anger grows over the country’s open-door refugee policy, the Sweden Democrats party is believed to be benefiting from claims of cover-ups of migrant crimes, most recently over sexual assaults by a group of young Afghan men on teenage girls at a Stockholm festival — for the second time.




2.



http://articles.courant.com/1998-10-18/news/9810180067_1_police-review-board-police-brutality-police-officer


State Man Seeks Asylum In Sweden
An Activist Claims His Efforts To Start A Civilian Review Board For Police Ignited A Campaign Of Harassment, But Swedish Authorities Have Denied His Request.
October 18, 1998|

It sounds like one of those ``News of the Weird'' column items: A Connecticut man is hiding in Sweden, where he seeks asylum, because he thinks U.S. police are out to get him.

The things is, it's true.

The asylum part anyway.

Richard ``Ritt'' Goldstein, 47, became the first American in years to apply for asylum when he moved to Sweden last year. He said his activism in pushing for a statewide civilian review board for police resulted in daily harassment from police in Connecticut and other states.

Goldstein's asylum request was rejected by the Swedes last month, and since then he has been living a refugee's life, supported by private citizens and European human rights groups.

``I live underground,'' he said, during a phone interview Friday. ``The thing is, very fortunately, there are those who looked at the work I had done and looked at the overwhelming evidence that I brought with me. Initially, there was a little skepticism, but here, unlike other places, they were not burdened by believing it can't happen. . . . Law enforcement wasn't a sacred cow to them.''

Whether Goldstein is characterized as a kook making false claims or a legitimate poster boy for the crusade against police brutality depends on who is doing the talking.

Just last week, Amnesty International launched a new campaign calling attention to human rights abuses within the United States, citing ``widespread and persistent'' police brutality as one of the top problems.

Former Norwalk Mayor William Collins said Goldstein had a strong commitment to his work, which included arranging a hearing at the state capitol last year on forming a statewide police review board.

Goldstein also headed a group called the Standing Committee on Law Enforcement Development. ``I found him very dedicated to his cause, which I supported very strongly,'' Collins said.

Connecticut police don't share that view.

Goldstein has made harassment complaints to several police departments, including Danbury, Norwalk, Wethersfield and Cromwell. His complaints date back to the 1980s, when his activism began.

The complaints seem to have a pattern: Goldstein told police his car or home or self was sprayed by chemicals or pepper spray, usually by someone in plain clothes
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joeb



The organizational model of a volunteer civilian review police board with subpoena
powers would have the power to hire and fire law enforcement personnel.


Should FBI agent Rogero be fired?

Does your community have a volunteer civilian review police board with subpoena
powers.?

Why not?

Watch how quickly Judge Salant gats a promotion.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/2016/01/20/9b53d750-bf97-11e5-83d4-42e3bceea902_story.html


FBI Agent Spared Jail After Assaulting 15-Year-Old Boy Because of Stellar Career



An FBI agent captured on video shoving a Maryland teenager was spared a jail sentence Wednesday because of what a judge called a stellar career.

The Washington Post reports that Gerald Rogero, a unit chief in the FBI’s counterterrorism division, likely will continue his duties with the bureau.

Montgomery County Circuit Judge Steven Salant placed Salant on two years’ probation and ordered him to undergo anger-management classes.

“Would it be in the best interest of the defendant — as a result of this isolated and unfortunate mistake of judgment — to deprive him of his employment, of his livelihood?” Salant asked from the bench, speaking to a courtroom packed with FBI agents supporting their colleague as well as friends and family supporting the teenager. “To impact upon his children? To impact upon the service that he can bring to the community? I think not.”

Rogero, 46, shoved a 15-year-old boy, sending him to the pavement.
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